Date
17 July 2024

Celebrate broad views of success

The kauri grows tall and strong. The harakeke, flax plant, is smaller and rich in fibre. The NZ curriculum principle “Hold a broad view of ākonga success” views every learner as having open-ended potential.

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Focus on possibilities

Focus on possibilities

Shift the question away from a problem or fix-it focus to a possibility focus.

There’s always a subtle feeling of disempowerment in a problem, a feeling that all doors are shut … there’s a weariness and stuckness to it. 

Simply asking, “What’s the possibility I see in this situation?” can make a big difference.

David Isaacs

Harness passions and strengths

Harness passions and strengths

Teachers recognised Wiremu Hamiora’s passion for sports. Giving Wiremu a leadership role has transformed him into a confident and passionate young person.

Look for success

Look for success

Relationship-based learning gave us new spaces to look for success, which was the narrative of our learners. What do they bring to the table before we actually get into their classrooms and teach? 

Rosina

Celebrate different types of success

Celebrate different types of success

By celebrating different types of success schools can demonstrate their commitment to learners with different strengths. Consider different types of success and how they are valued and celebrated within the school.

For example, students may show strengths such as: 

  • demonstrating school values
  • cultural or spiritual values
  • qualities such as kindness and positivity
  • leadership skills
  • interpersonal skills
  • academic success
  • sporting success
  • physical skills
  • excellence in creative arts or craft
  • excellence in building and trade skills
  • individual pursuits such as climbing or skateboarding.

Value what each student brings

Value what each student brings

Many aspects of students' lives remain hidden unless we offer multiple opportunities to share stories and experiences and connect these to learning.

John Robinson, HoD Learning Support at Onslow College, reflects on how inclusive practice is developing across the school.

Recognise student strengths and interests

Recognise student strengths and interests

Gisborne Boys' High School’s Whakairo course, lifted the performance of students from all cultures by delivering a culturally engaging curriculum.

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Commit to whole-school approaches”:

Return to the guide “Behaviour and learning”

Guide to Index of the guide: Behaviour and learning

Strategies for action:

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