Date
22 July 2024
B&L test PR FSTN 2020 519

Behaviour and learning
- Updated
- Popular

This guide focuses on proactive approaches that can help ākonga to thrive in their learning environments. 

As learning, behaviour, and wellbeing are inseparable, this guide illustrates how to ensure students' strengths, interests, learning needs and preferences are considered in the design of learning environments. 

The approach is supported by a ngahere or forest metaphor that emphasises relationships and empathy. By nurturing the potential of each student we protect the tapu and mana of all ākonga.

Understanding behaviour

Key concepts and terms related to behaviour and learning.

If students are learning successfully, if they are feeling connected, if they know that people care, they are less likely to behave in ways that jeopardise their opportunities to be part of that.

Ngaire Ashmore, Principal, Tangaroa College

Summary of important concepts:

Strategies for action

Commit to whole-school approaches

Staff act as forest guardians and ensure that ākonga thrive in the environments we create with them. We use our collective strengths to build ākonga and whānau-centered approaches that understand, recognise and respond to ākonga needs.

Six suggestions for implementing this strategy:

  1. Embed relational approaches

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  2. Honour and value te ao Māori

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  3. Value diversity

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  4. Agree clear expectations

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  5. Build high expectations and strengths-based approaches

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  6. Celebrate broad views of success

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources

Foster relationships and partnerships

Relationships grow a sense of belonging, which is an important basis for learning and engagement.

Five suggestions for implementing this strategy:

  1. Deepen relationships with students and whānau

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  2. Connect with daily interactions

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  3. Explore and find solutions together

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  4. Empower students

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  5. Support positive peer relationships

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources

Design learning for all

Ask students what inclusion means to them. Allow their experiences to shape your teaching.

Five suggestions for implementing this strategy:

  1. Develop an engaging local curriculum

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  2. Design responsive physical environments

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  3. Use flexible teaching approaches

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  4. Create structure and routine

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  5. Reduce overload and sensory challenges

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources

Foster wellbeing and mental health

Take a planned and empathetic approach to enabling students to strengthen their wellbeing and mental health. 

Te piko o te māhuri, tērā te tupu o te rākau.

The way a sapling is nurtured determines how strong it will grow as a tree.

Five suggestions for implementing this strategy:

  1. Use trauma-informed practices

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  2. Prioritise wellbeing

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  3. Support mental health

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  4. Teach relaxation techniques

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  5. Teach coping strategies

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources

Embed social and emotional learning

In the ngahere the kaitiaki or guardian helps the plants to grow strong by providing support when it is needed. In the classroom we help ākonga to develop a toolkit of strategies to support their personal, social and emotional wellbeing.

It’s vital for their identity. If they know who they are, they can have somewhere to grow from. They’re more responsive in the learning environment. 

It’s setting them up with tools for life, with a mind-set to help them navigate the world. Being aware of what’s around them, making sure they maintain a respect for themselves that they can then give to others.

Ebony Repia

Five suggestions for implementing this strategy:

Be proactive

In the ngahere, the kaitiaki or guardian recognises signs of distress and responds early.

When a flower doesn’t bloom you fix the environment in which it grows, not the flower.

Six suggestions for implementing this strategy:

  1. Identify factors that shape behaviour

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  2. Recognise and remove barriers to learning

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  3. Manage times of stress or change

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  4. Recognise emerging distress

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  5. Plan and practise adult responses

    Includes:

    • Resources
  6. Create support plans

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources

Respond in challenging situations

In the ngahere, if we notice a young plant is not thriving, we look at the overall environment to find out what needs to change to help the plant to thrive.

He moana pupuke ka ekengia e te waka 

A choppy sea can be navigated.

Five suggestions for implementing this strategy:

  1. Recognise

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  2. Respond

    Includes:

    • Resources
  3. Use de-escalation strategies

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  4. Respond safely to physical aggression

    Includes:

    • Resources
  5. Restore

    Includes:

    • Resources

Key resources

Screen Shot 2020 07 31 at 11.24.34 AM

He māpuna te tamaiti: Supporting social and emotional competence in early learning

Read time: 160 min

This resource has been written for kaiako in Aotearoa New Zealand early learning services. Its purpose is to support you to understand and draw on effective practices that enhance children’s social and emotional competence, engagement, and learning.

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Teaching for Positive Behaviour

Teaching for positive behaviour: Supporting engagement, participation, and learning

This resource supports teachers in all New Zealand primary and secondary schools to understand and draw on effective strategies that enhance students' behaviour, engagement, participation, and learning.

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

11654 [Mental-health-education-and-hauora-Teaching-interpersonal-skills-resilience-and-wellbeing-.jpg]

Mental health education and hauora: Teaching interpersonal skills, resilience, and wellbeing

This resource supports teaching children and young people about mental health, wellbeing, resilience, and interpersonal skills. It includes lesson plans that work for multiple year and curriculum levels, and are particularly useful for Years 7–11 health education.

Publisher: NZCER Press

Price: One off charge $85.00

Website

Encourage positive behaviours

This resources provides strategies for encouraging positive behaviour in the individual, the classroom and school-wide.

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Website

Responding to ākonga distress without restraint

Information to help you think beyond the physical restraint rules and guidelines and focus on understanding, recognising and responding to ākonga distress at school.

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Guide to Index of the guide: Behaviour and learning

Strategies for action:

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