Date
20 June 2024

Provide writing supports for literacy in NCEA

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Model structures for writing

Model structures for writing

Use exemplars and planning sheets help learners see text structures and organise their ideas.

Provide consistent supports across departments.

Offer writing templates

Offer writing templates

Model how to use templates to organise ideas.

This will help reduce the cognitive load during the writing task.

Use these templates in Effective strategies for literacy in Years 9-13 to scaffold writing:

  • Report template (p. 166)
  • Writing frame, scaffolded template (p. 168)
  • Using connectives and signal words template (p. 169)
  • Graphic organiser templates (pp. 163-164)

 

Useful acronyms to support organisation:

  • Point, Evidence, Explain, Link – PEEL
  • Topic, Idea, Detail, End – TIDE

Provide supports for spelling

Provide supports for spelling

Ākonga can be empowered in their spelling by knowing that they have access to a range of tools and supports to help them.

  • Provide short sentences for students to connect and rewrite into compound and complex sentences.
  • Help students to see root words and prefix/suffix additions. Older students with dyslexia rely on words' meaningful parts to support their spelling.
  • Display new vocabulary on a word all or at the top of an assignment to support usage.
  • Use text-to-speech so students can hear their writing read back, this helps them identify errors.
  • Investigate practice programmes for learning words/decoding such as StepsWeb and Wordchain to supplement instruction.
  • Encourage use of spell check tools.

Provide constructive feedback and feedforward

Provide constructive feedback and feedforward

Feedback and feedforward may include a focus on skills, attitudes, or task completion strategy.

  • Provide feedback/forward halfway through first draft rather than just at the end.
  • Discuss draft writing plan, and how relationships and connections between points are made.
  • Encourage ākonga to self-correct by asking them questions rather than saying, “That’s wrong.” Be positive and praise frequently.
  • Frame feedback positively. Where there are errors, show a model of correct working or outline specific steps to guide progress.
  • Consider the volume of feedback. Keep feedback focused on agreed specific learning goals and avoid overwhelming a student by correcting everything.
  • Empower learners with good self-monitoring and self-checking skills, tools and strategies.

Source: Dyslexia Association of Singapore (opens in a new tab/window)

Useful resources

Useful resources

Next steps

Return to the guide “Dyslexia and learning”

Guide to Index of the guide: Dyslexia and learning

Strategies for action:

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