Date
17 July 2024

Connect with daily interactions

In the ngahere or forest we nurture our plants daily, slowly getting to know what they need to thrive. Daily connections are the little things that bring us closer together and create a culture of care.

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Foster positive relationships

Foster positive relationships

We found that positive student-teacher relationships were one of the most important factors for young people’s engagement in school. Students were much more likely to be engaged in learning activities when they felt their teacher listened to them, helped them, respected them, and was fair to them.

Engage with positive activities

Engage with positive activities

Redoubt North School staff and students talk about how they have used lego to engage and excite their learners.

Make daily connections

Make daily connections

Feelings of belonging and being valued are at the heart of learning and behaviour. What you think, say and do matters because each interaction contributes to whanaungatanga and trust.
  • Connect to welcome students into the class.
  • Connect, chat and show you care. For example, open a conversation about known interests, whānau, important people, role models.
  • Connect and value culture. For example, open a conversation with te reo or aspects of ākonga pepeha, or incorporate tikanga, cultural contexts and whakapapa.
  • Connect and listen. Show that you respect their opinions and voice.
  • Connect with no agenda to deepen the relationship.
  • Connect and be flexible. Allow for different approaches and ways of being.

Value students for who they are

Value students for who they are

“Students don’t just need a teacher, they also need someone who they feel values them for who they are”. This video highlights the role of all staff in positive daily interactions to support Pasifika and non Pasifika ākonga.

Listen and learn together

Listen and learn together

Whaowhia te kete mātauranga

Fill the basket of knowledge

 

Building our knowledge helps us support children more effectively.

We are true partners when:

  • you listen to what I have to say
  • you acknowledge my intelligence
  • you want to learn more about my ways
  • you don’t judge me
  • you engage me in genuine dialogue
  • we make decisions together
  • you show that my child matters to you
  • you include my experience, knowledge, and viewpoints with yours.

Source: Education Review Office (opens in a new tab/window)

Make time to connect

Make time to connect

Ashhurst school staff explain how flipped learning gives teachers more one-to-one time with ākonga, resulting in better relationships for learning.

A secondary example is NZQA: ‘Going Digital’ the Tamaki College Story.

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Foster relationships and partnerships”:

Return to the guide “Behaviour and learning”

Guide to Index of the guide: Behaviour and learning

Strategies for action:

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