Date
22 February 2024

Take a people-first approach

Consider how your knowledge of learners influences your approach to assessment design.

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Walk in my shoes

Walk in my shoes

Before you begin the design process, consider the three principles of UDL reframed from an ākonga perspective.

Engagement: Is the learning in this assessment of value to me, is it worth investing in and will I be supported to manage myself and succeed?

Representation: Can I see my cultures, identities, languages and communication modes, and the ways I make sense of information represented in this assessment?

Action and expression: Can I participate in this assessment and have equity of access to the tools and activities? Will I be able to express myself and demonstrate my understanding in ways that work for me? Will I be supported to plan and manage my learning?

Use a design process that begins with the people

Use a design process that begins with the people

Use this interactive version of the UDL Thinking Cycle to guide your people-first thinking.

Let your knowledge of ākonga influence how you design assessments and supports.

12045 [UDL-thinking-cycle.png]

Source: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Get to know me checklist

Get to know me checklist

Ākonga experience being seen when “who they are and what they bring”, influences the design of the learning.

In your subject area, consider how you create opportunities to learn about the following:

  • cultures, languages and identities
  • local connections and affiliations
  • wairua, moral, wellbeing and physical health
  • personal connections and relationships
  • passions and challenges in different learning areas
  • out of school and kura projects and activities
  • dreams and aspirations
  • learning preferences
  • abilities and interests
  • what might be “on top” for learners, e.g. a big performance, sports event, exams.

Ask what helps and build it in

Ask what helps and build it in

If we don’t ask what helps, we may miss helps.

All the approaches Katrina mentions can be built into the learning environment. They are good for Katrina and can be valuable options for everyone else.

Ways to deepen understanding

Ways to deepen understanding

Examples of intentional ways to get to know students.

  • Regular check-ins
  • Discussion with whānau
  • Noticing when students “light up” as learners because they are talking about or working on something they value
  • Interviews and intentional conversations
  • Creating opportunities for leadership.
  • Opportunities to give feedback on teaching
  • Short surveys
  • Co-design opportunities where students and teachers design learning together
  • Invite students to share insights or ask questions about real-world events
  • Offer assignments and assessments that allow students to share their experiences and interests
  • Attend extracurricular activities featuring your students
  • Attend an event in your students’ community

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Design considerations in NCEA assessments”:

Return to the guide “Universal Design for Learning”

Guide to Index of the guide: Universal Design for Learning

Strategies for action:

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