Date
17 July 2024

Teach social and emotional skills

Help students to develop social and emotional awareness, regulation and spiritual connectedness.

Use Kōwhiti Whakapae

Use Kōwhiti Whakapae

Kōwhiti Whakapae is a tool based on Te Whāriki, the Early Childhood Curriculum. It provides a wealth of examples of culturally sustaining ways to develop social and emotional awareness, regulation and spiritual connectedness.

 

Understand social norms, diversity and masking

Understand social norms, diversity and masking

Encourage and value diverse ways of interacting rather than expecting all learners to socialise in the same way.

For some students, pressure to adhere to social norms and mask or hide individual differences can cause anxiety, stress and exhaustion. Consider the ways that communication varies across cultures and contexts.

For example, eye contact may be an inappropriate social skills goal as it can be uncomfortable for some autistic people and those with anxieties, and is disrespectful in some cultures.

Appropriate social skills are those that support the individual’s strengths, needs, personal goals and values. Work with whānau and ākonga to identify appropriate social and emotional goals.

Source: The neurodivergent guide to socialising, verywell mind (opens in a new tab/window)

Provide co-regulation as students learn

Provide co-regulation as students learn

Self-regulation is the ability to moderate or control emotions and actions in order to function effectively and get along with others. Support ākonga to develop interoception and provide co-regulation as students learn. 

 

Interoception

Interoception is thought to be a prerequisite for self-regulation. Interoception is recognition and understanding of the internal physical states of the body, for example, being aware of the physical signs that you are thirsty, cold or becoming angry or upset. It is a first step in managing emotions.

 Co-regulation

Co-regulation is the ability to regulate emotions and manage stressful situations with the support and direction of others. Support may come from a range of people.

Self-regulation

Self-regulation is the ability to moderate or control emotions and actions independently. In the classroom, self-regulation supports students to engage in learning activities, participate in social interactions and get along with others.

Get Ready to Learn – Student Wellbeing Hub

This Australian booklet has 39 activities to develop interoception. Use your knowledge of, or access to, te ao Māori to adapt or expand the activities to Aotearoa contexts.

Support social and emotional development

Support social and emotional development

Provide targeted learning and a range of supports to support social and emotional development of students.

Begin with co-regulation, helping students recognise emotions and manage stressful situations. Reduce support as ākonga develop skills.

  • Use modelling and coaching to help students recognise how they feel or how someone else might be feeling.
  • Use whole class visual and verbal prompts to support awareness.
  • Teach and practise conflict-resolution and cooperative skills.
  • Develop problem solving skills by analysing events.
  • Take a tuakana-teina approach, to build self-confidence, a sense of belonging, and enhance academic skills.
  • Teach reflective listening.

Source: CASEL (opens in a new tab/window)

Integrate SEL into the classroom

Integrate SEL into the classroom

SEL is most effective when it is part of daily classroom life.

Useful resources

Useful resources

Website

Kōwhiti Whakapae

Kōwhiti Whakapae is a tool based on Te Whāriki, the Early Childhood Curriculum. It includes examples of culturally sustaining ways to develop social and emotional awareness, regulation and spiritual connectedness.

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Visit website

Website

Understanding social and emotional learning

Resources to support social and emotional learning. Includes Ata and Oho cards and activities.

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Visit website

Website

He Māpuna te Tamaiti

Resources to help teachers support social and emotional competence in early learning.

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Visit website

Website

Sparklers website

Collection of resources for students and teachers to help grow ākonga wellbeing and emotional literacy. Can be filtered by topic, competency, activity type and Te Whare Tapa Whā.

Publisher: Sparklers

Visit website

Website

Kei Whea A Mauri Tau

Resource for parents and teachers to read to tamariki aged 6 to 8 years to help them learn about connecting with themselves, others and the environment and how to respond to their emotions.

Publisher: He Paiaka Tōtara

Visit website

Website

Get ready to learn

Australian booklet with 39 activities to develop interoception and self-regulation.

Publisher: Education Services Australia

Visit website

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Embed social and emotional learning”:

Return to the guide “Behaviour and learning”

Guide to Index of the guide: Behaviour and learning

Strategies for action:

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