Date
23 July 2024

Agree clear expectations

Agree strong positive expectations and embed them across the school.

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Let values guide practices

Let values guide practices

Papatoetoe South School principal, Caroline Chawke talks about how their whakataukī guides teachers, learners and whānau to think and act positively in every interaction that takes place in a school.

Clearly state positive expectations

Clearly state positive expectations

Use school values as a basis for co-creating a small number of clearly stated positive expectations for students, staff and whānau.

For example:

  • Avoid rigid behaviour expectations that do not cater for the diverse needs and abilities of ākonga.
  • Provide a small number of positive values so they are easily brought to mind. 
  • Share values across the school and make them visible in all classrooms.
  • Develop a shared understanding of what the values mean in practice by working with staff, students, whānau and the community.
  • Reinforce and repeat positive values in daily interactions.
  • Give examples of the values in practice using images, text and multimedia such as videos and images.
  • Teach students how to enact school values.
  • Acknowledge and celebrate positive examples.

Set a positive school culture

Set a positive school culture

Manurewa Intermediate School staff, ākonga and whānau talk about how they changed the school culture “to help students feel safe and secure and to know that they can learn and be the best they possibly can… and have fun”.

Embed core values

Embed core values

Pearl-Cohn High School embedded shared expectations across the school to build a positive school culture.

Respond using restorative approaches

Respond using restorative approaches

A restorative response focuses on accountability and obligation to repair the harm and meet the needs of those involved rather than on guilt, blame and punishment.

Restorative processes are sometimes perceived as soft approaches. Tapping into the teachable potential of unwanted events, prioritising obligations for repairing harm and building a community of care makes our responses stronger and sustainable, not weaker.

 It is a layered approach to understanding what is shaping behaviour and involves collaborative sense-making.

Simple focus questions include:

  • What happened?
  • Who was affected and how?
  • What obligations do the parties have?

For more information around planning conversations and meetings, see the Restore suggestion in the Respond in challenging situations strategy of this guide

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Commit to whole-school approaches”:

Return to the guide “Behaviour and learning”

Guide to Index of the guide: Behaviour and learning

Strategies for action:

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