Date
23 July 2024

Reduce airborne allergy triggers

Suggestion for implementing the strategy ‘Create an inclusive learning environment’

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Airborne allergens

Airborne allergens

Children and young people may respond to airborne allergens by sneezing or scratching, coughing, having itchy eyes or a runny nose, and their eczema may flare.

Common airborne allergens include:

  • pollens from grasses, trees, and weeds
  • animal saliva, hair, and dander
  • droppings from cockroaches and house dust mites
  • mold and mildew spores.

Airborne allergens are not often triggers for anaphylaxis.

Source: Allergy and Anaphylaxis Australia (opens in a new tab/window)

Identify triggers in your classroom

Identify triggers in your classroom

Allergies and asthma is an interactive image, identifying and describing allergy triggers.

Work with your students to create something similar for your classroom. Take a photo and add speech bubbles, or use an application like Thinglink.

Limit exposure

Limit exposure

Exposure to allergens can vary by time, location, and type of room within a building.

  • Find out if pets and their habitats, such as straw and hay, are potential allergen triggers.
  • Use air conditioners and keep windows and doors closed during windy days and high pollen seasons.
  • If possible, refrain from outside activities during times of high pollen counts – Annual pollen calendar, Allergy New Zealand.
  • Avoid walking in areas with long grass on trips and excursions.
  • Wash bedding used in early childhood centres and medical rooms in hot water weekly.
  • Wash toys and dress-ups regularly to eliminate dust.
  • Wipe down window sills and areas where dust gathers.
  • Plan to clean carpets throughout the year.
  • Keep areas free of leftover food and drink as this can encourage cockroaches and small rodents.
  • Wipe all surfaces after food preparation and eating.

Source: Cleveland Clinic (opens in a new tab/window)

Potential triggers

Potential triggers

Review these common airborne allergens in your environment.

11567 [Airborne-and-environmental-allergens.png]

Source: Ministry of Education

Source:
Ministry of Education

Useful resources

Useful resources

Website

Pet allergy

This fact sheet provides information on pet allergies.

Publisher: Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

Visit website

Website

Allergen minimisation

This information includes advice about how to limit exposure to allergens.

Publisher: Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia

Visit website

Website

Types of allergies

This website provides useful, detailed information on a broad range of allergy triggers.

Publisher: American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

Visit website

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Create an inclusive learning environment”:

Return to the guide “Allergies and learning”

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