Date
26 September 2021

Changes to physical wellbeing

Understand the impacts on learning and wellbeing.

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Headaches and eye problems

Headaches and eye problems

Headaches and eye problems are very common after a brain injury.

Headaches can be caused by tiredness, excessive noise, or periods of concentration.

Eye problems are usually the result of the brain not working as well as usual. Some children find that bright light hurts them, and that it helps to wear sunglasses, even indoors.

Sight is sometimes a little blurred, either because the eyes are not focusing well, or because they are not lining up correctly.

Source: Adapted from What is brain injury? (opens in a new tab/window)

Reduced energy levels

Reduced energy levels

Young people who have experienced concussion share their stories of injury and recovery.

Effects of fatigue

Effects of fatigue

Children and young people may present a range of behaviours related to fatigue. These include:

  • yawning, listless, passive or withdrawn
  • drifting off task, “switching off”, distracted
  • poorer memory than usual
  • increased emotional or disruptive behaviour
  • slower performance on tasks
  • headaches or other pains
  • increased sensitivity to certain foods, noise, smells, textures, and sounds
  • emotional responses (such as frequently out of seat, clapping hands, standing up, making noises), triggered by sensory overload or crowded environments
  • not liking to be touched, choosy about clothing, always touching other people or things
  • swinging, climbing, running, and crashing into things
  • clumsy, uncoordinated movement, slow or erratic drawing or writing
  • difficulties with cutting, drawing, dressing, or feeding.

Source: Fatigue management (opens in a new tab/window)

Summary

Summary

Children and young people can experience a wide range of physical changes when they experience a brain injury.

  • Compromised movement
  • Reduced stamina and endurance
  • Poor physical coordination
  • Headaches
  • Incontinence
  • Seizures and epilepsy
  • Fatigue
  • Hormone disruption
  • Sensory difficulties
  • Disruption of sleep

Source: Brain Injury Hub (opens in a new tab/window)

Useful Resources

Useful Resources

Fatigue management

Fatigue management

Read time: 2 min

Publisher: Brain Injury NZ

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Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Understand impacts on learning and wellbeing”:

Return to the guide “Supporting learners with acquired brain injury”

Guide to Index of the guide: Acquired brain injury and learning

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