Date
23 May 2024

Develop your hybrid learning vision

Hybrid learning builds resilient schools and caters for a variety of ākonga needs. It provides in-person and remote forms of teaching and learning that happen in parallel.

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Involve the school community from the outset

Involve the school community from the outset

Collaborate to build your hybrid learning approach together.
  • Involve ākonga, teachers, other school staff, whanau, hapū, iwi and the school community from the outset.
  • Ensure all voices, both tangata whenua and tangata tiriti, are heard and have influence.
  • Building reciprocal, learning-centred relationships between students, whānau, community, and teachers.
  • Use an inquiry approach to identify needs and plan supports. For example hybrid models for younger or supported students will be significantly different from those designed for older more independent students.
  • Lead professional learning conversations and opportunities to learn about hybrid approaches.

Work as a team

Work as a team

Effective teams develop mutually agreed understandings and ways of working. Members keep the focus on student learning, positive relationships, and developing ways of communicating that work for all those involved.

He whiringa takitahi, Ka hunahuna
He whiringa ngātahi, Ka raranga, Ka mau.

If you plait one at a time, the ends will fragment
If you weave together, it will hold.

Provide leadership for visible learning

Provide leadership for visible learning

Principal Gary Roberts talks about the importance of making learning visible to allow students to be connected and active lifelong learners.

Plan for change

Plan for change

Regardless of where your school is at with hybrid learning, planning is critical for any transformational change.
  • Build a team to lead hybrid learning design and implementation.
  • Gather stories of good practice.
  • Gather information to understand the hybrid learning needs of your families and communities.
  • Develop a shared understanding of the drivers for change by working with kaiako, ākonga, whānau and community throughout the process.
  • Develop a shared school vision for teaching and learning that captures what a change to a hybrid learning approach will achieve.
  • Create an action plan that clarifies steps, consultation that includes student and whānau voice, resourcing, timelines, professional learning, and roles and responsibilities. Include provision for targeted support to meet individual needs where required.
  • Monitor, support and reflect regularly. Make changes that address needs as they emerge.

Source: Informed by The 8-Step Process for Leading Change | Dr. John Kotter (opens in a new tab/window)

Useful resources

Useful resources

Website

Hybrid learning guides

A series of guides looking at drivers, communicating with different groups, and key actions, pedagogies and principles.

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Website

Hybrid learning thought pieces

A series of thought pieces by Derek Wenmouth on hybrid learning and resilient schools. It includes a teacher guide for getting started with hybrid learning.

Publisher: Futuremakers NZ

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Website

Technology supporting the school vision

Principal Melissa Bell describes St Hilda's school vision and how technology is enabling students to learn anywhere at any time and work collaboratively both locally and globally.

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Website

Making hybrid learning sustainable

Education Gazette article on how the Ministry of Education is analysing good practice in action to develop guidance for all schools and kura on hybrid learning.

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Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Use hybrid learning approaches”:

Return to the guide “Curriculum accessibility”

Guide to Index of the guide: Curriculum accessibility

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