Date
13 April 2024

Gather information to inform practice

Use a team approach to gather information, understand and respond to student strengths and needs, and plan and monitor the effectiveness of learning approaches.

On this page:

Get the right people around the table

Get the right people around the table

Bring together a team to work in partnership with the autistic student and their whānau.
  • Discuss with the student and their whānau who could be part of a supportive team, for example the learning support coordinator, RTLB, support worker, dean.
  • Consider asking colleagues who have experience of autism and teaching autistic students if they would like to contribute.
  • Consider connecting to external expertise or agencies with specialist knowledge in autism, for example Autism NZ, Altogether Autism.
  • Build regular times for communication.

Connect with community and cultural disability groups

Connect with community and cultural disability groups

Build relationships with local iwi and Pasifika cultural and disability groups, such as the Pasifika Autism Support Group.

Make regular times to communicate

Make regular times to communicate

Communicate and share information and successes in a meaningful way, demonstrating understanding and support for parents’ concerns.
  • Encourage parents and caregivers to share what they have noticed or assessments they have had done outside school.
  • Build on any programmes or materials used at home to maximise consistency and support for the student.
  • Develop systems for passing on information about a student’s needs, progress and next steps.
  • Share information about out-of-school programmes that may help to boost the student’s self-esteem, for example, classes or groups for music, art, dance or sports.

Share information using digital tools

Share information using digital tools

John Robinson reflects on the value of sharing information using the school SMS and student e-portfolios.

Take an inquiry approach

Take an inquiry approach

Develop a responsive evidenced-based process of working together that supports students' self advocacy.

  • Support the ākonga and whānau to lead and guide the conversation.
  • Work collaboratively to identify key learning goals, responsibilities and what success would look like.
  • Share concerns, questions, and ideas.
  • Consider ākonga strengths as well as barriers to learning.
  • Identify how solutions or strategies will be implemented, refined and reviewed.
  • Discuss how to assess learning in ways that work for the student.
  • Agree on how to stay in touch and share information.

Gather useful data

Gather useful data

Gather qualitative and quantitative data to build a full picture of the student's strengths, needs and preferences.

Qualitative data examples:

  • student and whānau voice, feedback, surveys and discussions
  • ākonga, kaiako and peers share experiences and impacts
  • reflections on learning and real time reporting techniques.

Quantitative data examples:

  • language and communication skills assessments and observations
  • social interaction observations
  • learning behaviour observations.

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Identify needs and ways to provide support”:

Return to the guide “Autism and learning”

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