Date
22 February 2024

Plan and build personalised pathways

Create and implement a long-term plan to build the skills and competencies the student needs to live a good life after school.

On this page:

Planning begins early, is aspirational and supports ākonga to become independent.

Adapted from: Principles – Enabling Good Lives

Start early

Start early

Future pathways and careers education starts at Years 7 and 8.

 

Specific transition planning also needs to start early to allow time to prepare students and their whānau for life after school. Document skills, experiences and qualifications to show progress over time.

“Support learners/ākonga to see the connections between what they are learning and the world of work.”

Source: The Statement of National Education and Learning Priorities (NELP) and the Tertiary Education Strategy (TES) – Ministry of Education

Plan ahead

Plan ahead

Rhiannon’s story of preparing for work and work experience highlights the importance of planning ahead, focusing on the student's strengths, and maximising community connections.

Make a future-focused plan

Make a future-focused plan

Plan for the future and build skills for independence and life after school throughout the school years.

Support student-centred planning with tools such as talking mats, visuals and choice boards that help students make decisions for themselves.

For more about talking mats see: What is a talking mat – TalkingMats.

Plans should:

  • define the vision or aspirations.
  • detail the steps and actions to achieve the vision.
  • be regularly reviewed and monitored.

Plans can come in a variety of formats. They may include:

  • Individual Education Plan (IEP) to outline current, long-term and transition goals. 
  • Individual Transition Plan (ITP) developed in senior years to identify and address skill building for independence.
  • Individual Career Plan (ICP) for employment and financial independence, community participation, home and living arrangements, independent mobility, peer relationships, sexuality and self-esteem.

Use a person-centred planning process

Use a person-centred planning process

Kataraina Pipi describes the unique way she uses the PATH planning tool in Aotearoa. PATH is a person-centred tool that can be used for strengths-based planning.

For more about the PATH planning tool see the PATH website.

Plan across all domains of life

Plan across all domains of life

Systematically develop ways for the student to acquire the skills they need in all domains of adult life: vocational skills, life skills, and social, academic and leisure skills.

Plan personalised NCEA pathways

Plan personalised NCEA pathways

Support students to identify options and pathways that match their interests and needs.

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Prepare students with future-focused skills”:

Return to the guide “Preparing students to leave school”

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