Date
22 February 2024

Create a student-centred team

Support students’ individual pathways by coordinating with families, iwi, hapū, community and businesses, along with government agencies and education providers.

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Provide quality advice and information

Provide quality advice and information

Support the student and their whānau to make informed decisions about transition.

Research suggests that learners value information from trusted, impartial sources and will generally turn to family, friends, and teachers with whom they have a strong relationship for advice.

Tertiary Education Commission Te Amorangi Mātauranga Matua (2014)

Build a team

Build a team

The student and their whānau or carers drive the transition process. A wider team provides support, experience and networks based on the student’s needs.

For example, teams include:

Student and whānau or carers

School staff:

  • Teachers and specialist teachers, for example, ORS teacher and teacher aides
  • In school learning support staff 
  • Deans and form teachers
  • Careers education teachers.

Education specialists:

  • Learning Support Coordinators (LSC)
  • Resource teachers
  • Other learning support specialists.

Key members of the community:

  • Hapū and iwi 
  • Businesses and employers
  • Tertiary providers
  • Community agencies and support groups
  • Youth workers
  • Health services.

Foster high expectations

Foster high expectations

Brooke Houghton describes how she knows her students and has high expectations for them all.

Seek to understand a student's culture

Seek to understand a student's culture

Six rangatahi who identify as deaf communicate their aspirations.

Access parent, community and advocacy support services

Access parent, community and advocacy support services

Local people, groups and support agencies can offer help with people’s everyday lives, and advocacy.

  • People who could be advocates and allies include whānau, friends, people from local clubs or support workers
  • Local parent groups or agencies 
  • Community groups such as cultural and iwi groups, sporting groups and clubs
  • Disability support groups such as IHC, IDEA services and Enable 
  • Advocacy groups such as Enabling Good Lives New Zealand and Disabled People’s Association New Zealand.

You can look for agencies that provide support at:

Support and services – Whaikaha Ministry of Disabled People
Community directory – Citizens Advice Bureau

Useful resources

Useful resources

Website

The role of families

Stresses the central role of whānau, and addressing individual needs within the context of the family as a whole.

Publisher: Enabling Good Lives

Visit website

File

Information for learners: Learner decision-making behaviours

Summary of research in 2012 on the decision-making behaviours of learners considering enrolling in tertiary study.

Publisher: Tertiary Education Commission

Download PDF (530 KB)

Website

National transition guidelines

Guidelines for supporting the transition of students with additional learning needs from school to adult life.

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Visit website

Website

Transition from school

Example of transition support services available for students funded by Ongoing Resourcing Scheme (ORS).

Publisher: Choices NZ

Visit website

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Develop effective whole-school practices”:

Return to the guide “Preparing students to leave school”

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