Welcome to Inclusive Education.


Preparing students to leave school

http://inclusive.tki.org.nz/guides/preparing-students-to-leave-school/

Schools are responsible for supporting all students to develop the competencies they need for the study, work, and lifelong learning that will help them to realise their potential. A focus on preparing for the future is an integral part of the curriculum throughout years 9–13.


This guide supports schools to personalise the curriculum for students in their secondary school years. It highlights the need for flexible approaches to meet the variability of students’ practical, learning, and emotional needs.

Access research and recommendations for self-review

Innovation in secondary schools should be supported by robust self-review to determine whether new approaches are making the intended improvements for all students.

For some students, particularly those with significant learning and social needs, the transition from school is probably the most crucial process for determining how the rest of their lives will unfold.

Ministry of Education ; Source: National Transition Guidelines

Suggestions and resources

An interconnected process (image)
A graphic depicting school responsibilities to prepare students to leave secondary school
Preparing students to leave secondary school

Many interrelated aspects need to be considered as each student prepares for leaving school. These are an integral part of the purpose of the curriculum.

Source: Ministry of Education

An interconnected process
Best practice guidelines

Best practice principles that underpin successful transitions are supported by recent New Zealand research and international best evidence.

  1. The transition from school process starts when the student turns 14. It aims to maximise academic achievement as well as functional life skills.

  2. The student and their family/whānau drive the process.

  3. Partnerships are developed between the school and community supports

  4. The transition plan is embedded in mainstream education and community settings.

  5. The process identifies and overcomes barriers to the student’s learning and support.

  6. The student and family/whānau are offered information and support that opens the door to a wide range of inclusive community-based options.

  7. There is a clear distinction between the needs of the family/whānau and the needs of the student during transition.

  8. Functional life skills should be developed and practised at home and in other natural settings.

  9. Outcomes of the transition planning process should be regularly evaluated.

Source: Adapted from the National Transition Guidelines

Best practice guidelines
ERO recommendations
  1. Use robust self-review processes. Determine the extent to which curriculum, careers, and pastoral care processes assist students to develop career management competencies and successful pathways from school.

  2. Develop curriculum and systems to ensure a focus on identifying and responding to the aspirations, strengths, and needs of all students and their families or whānau.

  3. Work increasingly with families, whānau, and iwi to develop student pathways to education, training, and employment.

  4. Engage local businesses and community health, social, and education agencies to respond to students’ futures in education, training, and employment.

  5. Identify and implement the innovation required to support the pathways and success of learners, including the development of courses for Māori and Pacific learners.

Source: Secondary schools: Pathways for future education, training and employment (July 2013)

ERO recommendations
A student-driven process

Review with students, whānau, and staff how your school supports students to plan and prepare for the future by asking the following questions:

  1. Does the student and their whānau actively drive the process?

  2. Is the student actively engaged in determining their current interests and future aspirations and how to pursue them?

  3. Does the student and their whānau have access to information and opportunities to explore post-school options?

  4. Does the student have repeated exposure to unfamiliar concepts and support to develop skills within the curriculum?

  5. Is the student supported to identify pathways to meet practical, learning, and emotional needs?

  6. Is the effectiveness of the transition support regularly evaluated with the student to identify and overcome barriers to the student’s transition preparations?

Source: Adapted from newzealanders.org – A website for the disability community

A student-driven process
Self-review tools

Use the following resources to support your self-review processes:

  1. Indicator framework – Responsive secondary schooling

  2. Self-review questions for schools

Self-review tools

Resources and downloads

National Transition Guidelines - Guidelines for transitioning students with special needs from school to adult life

These guidelines provide schools and agencies with best practice information to ensure effective transition supports are in place.

Secondary Schools: Pathways for future education, training, and employment (July 2013)

This report investigates how well 74 secondary schools have prepared their students for future opportunities in education, training, and employment.

Preparing students to leave school: School responsibilities, starting from year 9

A graphic depicting school responsibilities to prepare students to leave secondary school.

How students make decisions

Students need support to understand how different factors influence their decision making, such as:

  1. self-knowledge (understanding one’s own aspirations, strengths, weaknesses, and motivations)

  2. occupational knowledge (knowledge of the world of work and study)

  3. sense of self and being able to imagine themselves into their futures

  4. support for choice-making

  5. aspirations for life style, which are strongly influenced by culture and context

  6. personal, social, psychological, and environmental factors

  7. influences from parents and community

  8. partial information

Source: Information for Learners: Learner decision-making behaviours: Research summary. Tertiary Education Commission Te Amorangi Mātauranga Matua (2014)

How students make decisions
Engagement with transition support

41 percent of students said they had never talked to a teacher or career advisor about their future options, and 45 percent had not taken part in related activities such as visiting a tertiary institution or attending a career expo.

Cathy Wylie, Edith Hodgen, Rosemary Hipkins and Karen Vaughan ; Source: On the edge of adulthood: Summary of key findings from the competent learners @ 16 project. NZCER (2009)
Engagement with transition support
Need for a systematic process

Systematic processes are needed to help students make connections between school and post-school possibilities and realities. Students need support to:

  1. engage in identity work

  2. explore their own abilities as life-long learners

  3. assess the landscape ahead

  4. learn strategies for managing the continuing development of career pathways.

Source: Information for learners: Learner decision-making behaviours: Research summary (page 6). Tertiary Education Commission Te Amorangi Mātauranga Matua (2014)

Need for a systematic process

Resources and downloads

On the edge of adulthood: Summary of key findings from the competent learners @ 16 project

Results of interviews with 447 students aged 16 about leaving school. This survey was part of a longitudinal study which began in 1993 and follows the progress of 500 New Zealanders from early childhood education through schooling and beyond.

16 and 17 year old learners ‘at risk’ of low achievement and poor outcomes

Research commissioned by the Ministry of Education to explore the achievements and transitions of 16- and 17-year-old students with moderate special education needs.

It’s not all black and white: The transition of students with dyslexia into the first year of university study

This thesis examines the experiences of four students with dyslexia at one New Zealand university. The ways in which the students frame their understanding of dyslexia and how this affects their approach to learning at university are examined.

Information for learners: Learner decision-making behaviours – Research summary

A 2014 Tertiary Education Commission research report, which focuses on how learners make decisions about tertiary study, the information learners need to help them make decisions on tertiary study, and the best ways to provide this information.

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Identify and involve partners who can support effective transition

Schools need to coordinate families, iwi, and community businesses, along with government agencies and education providers – working with them to support students’ individual pathways.

Research suggests that learners value information from trusted, impartial sources and will generally turn to family, friends, and teachers with whom they have a strong relationship for advice.

Tertiary Education Commission Te Amorangi Mātauranga Matua (2014) ; Source: Information for learners: Learner decision-making behaviours: Research summary.

Suggestions and resources

Main influencer

For most students, families were their single most useful source of career information. More than 80 percent said that talking with their family about their future options was either “very useful” or “useful”.

Talking with their friends was their next most useful source of career information.

 

Cathy Wylie, Edith Hodgen, Rosemary Hipkins and Karen Vaughan ; Source: On the edge of adulthood: Summary of key findings from the competent learners @ 16 project. NZCER (2009)
Main influencer
How parents can help

As parents and caregivers are the single biggest influence on a young person’s career decisions, encourage them to:

  1. build dreams with their child

  2. have career and future-orientated conversations early on

  3. discuss and explore career options

  4. support their young people to develop a CV

  5. support work experiences within the types of jobs that interest their teenager

  6. support their teenager with learning life and work skills at home.

Source: Careers New Zealand

How parents can help
Using a shared e-Portfolio (NZ) (video)
Involving families in transitions

A learning support HoD describes how an online portfolio enables aspirations to be shared easily.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Using a shared e-Portfolio (NZ)
Understanding whānau needs and aspirations

Develop a shared understanding of the student’s aspirations, based on their hopes and ambitions and their cultural contexts and responsibilities.

  1. Listen to the aspirations of parents and whānau.

  2. Provide the family or whānau with information that will help them to create a positive vision of their child’s future.

  3. Acknowledge that the family or whānau may have their own support needs and alert them to support agencies and information.

  4. Discuss the student's and family’s past experiences with schooling and the implications of these for growing positive relationships.

  5. Discuss how to support increased independence as the student moves into adulthood.

Source: National transition guidelines for specialist educators, schools, and parents: Guidelines for transitioning students with special needs from school to adult life

Understanding whānau needs and aspirations
Information-sharing strategies

Provide multiple opportunities for parents and whānau to build their understanding of what transition from school involves.

  1. Provide a contact person for each family so that they can discuss concerns and ask questions.

  2. Invite parents to transition information hui.

  3. Invite parents to events where their young person is being recognised for an achievement.

  4. Invite parents to listen to talks by past students who are doing well in tertiary study or employment.

  5. Keep parents and whānau informed of expos they can attend with their teenager.

  6. Introduce parents and whānau to the careers staff.

  7. Provide parents and whānau with timely communication about practical ways they can support their young person.

Information-sharing strategies

Resources and downloads

Information for parents – NCEA level 2: A pass to the future.

This booklet for parents outlines the range of supports available to students through the Ministry of Education Achievement 2013–17 initiative.

Services and support in special education for children at school

This booklet for parents of young people with special needs explains the planning and support required to facilitate a smooth transition from secondary school.

Coordinating community partnership

Establish an advisory team to:

  • share students’ aspirations and interests with community, employer, and tertiary representatives 
  • build shared understanding of student diversity
  • identify and coordinate opportunities and shared programmes for students such as tertiary high school 
  • identify possible community mentors for students
  • keep the school up-to-date with community plans and priorities
  • monitor and refine the effectiveness of school-wide transition support for all students.

Include students, whānau, learning support professionals, school staff, and employers, as well as tertiary providers, community leaders, and support agency representatives in the transition from school advisory team.

Ensure a diverse representation of students is included in the team.

Coordinating community partnership
Find community mentors

A community mentor or supporter beyond immediate family can have a positive impact on students' confidence and access to opportunities. Let your community know you are always looking for local people who:

  1. will be good advocates and allies

  2. can provide practical help (with transport, for example)

  3. can help solve problems

  4. can be a mentor

  5. can support students to find relevant information

  6. are good listeners.

Find community mentors
MIT tertiary high school (NZ) (video)
Pathways into the future

Principal Peter Heron, describes how to plan for and overcome barriers to successful student transitions into the workforce.

Key messages highlighted in this PowerPoint presentation.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Youth Guarantee

MIT tertiary high school (NZ)
Partnering with established support services

Students need coherent support. Expect to work in partnership with those professionals already in established relationships with students and whānau, such as:

  • resource teachers of learning and behaviour, resource teachers of literacy, and learning support staff 
  • resource teachers: vision 
  • resource teachers for the deaf 
  • Physical Disability Service, including occupational therapists and physiotherapists 
  • psychological, psycho-social or chronic mental health services, Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu The Correspondence School, Regional Health Schools, and Youth Services.

Utilise their experience and networks in the development of inclusive school-wide processes.

Source: Adapted from: 16 and 17 year old learners ‘at risk’ of low achievement and poor outcomes – Identifying opportunities for, and barriers to, achievement of NCEA Level 2 and effective transitions

Partnering with established support services
Partner with tertiary learning support teams

Build relationships with learning support and disability services at tertiary institutions to support:

  1. greater understanding of the skills and competencies students will need when they transition to tertiary education

  2. increased opportunities for more personalised transition processes responsive to each student’s needs.

Partner with tertiary learning support teams

Resources and downloads

Ministry of Social Development National Contracts Advisors

This is a list of contact details for the providers in your area who can support students with low-to-moderate learning needs as they transition from school to adulthood.

Youth Guarantee

This is a source of information about a wide range of learning opportunities, the education network, and clear pathways from school to work and study.

Careers NZ – Practitioners

This section of the Careers NZ website has a range of information for teachers about careers support.

Youth Service – Providers by region

This site provides links to youth services that offer one-to-one coaching for students in work and study options. It also lists health and social support services.

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Develop curriculum and systems that respond to all students’ aspirations

Value and plan for student variability from the outset. Build flexibility into systems, processes, and support models. Adopt teaching models that increase student engagement and opportunities for success.

Students are not conveniently fitted into an existing programme. Instead, the programme is discussed, tailored and resourced to meet their learning needs. Responsive teaching is important for all learners.

Source: Schools' provision for students at risk of not achieving. ERO report (August 2008)

Suggestions and resources

3 principles of UDL (image)
Screen Shot 2016 06 29 at 9.41.53 AM
UDL principles

The UDL principles highlight areas where we can minimise barriers to learning and increase supports and options at the outset.

Each principle has a related set of guidelines and checkpoints to help teachers create more inclusive learning environments. 

Source: Adapted from CAST UDL

3 principles of UDL
Equitable access to quality teaching

When Jack’s school became aware in year 13 that Jack intended to continue on to university, he received support and encouragement.

He was put into the top English class with a teacher who spent extra time going over essay structure and giving Jack the tools for getting his ideas down clearly.

Maths, which continues to be an area of weakness, became a target subject to ensure that Jack had the appropriate numeracy credits for University Entrance.

Source: It’s not all black and white: The transition of students with dyslexia into the first year of university study. Massey University, NZ.
Equitable access to quality teaching
Learning without limits (NZ) (video)
Don’t let support needs limit expectations

Brooke Houghton describes how she knows her students and has high expectations for them all.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Learning without limits (NZ)
Investigate students’ expectations
  1. What messages do school leaders communicate about their expectations for all students?

  2. How are these messages received?

  3. To what extent do students understand and share the expectations we have for them?

  4. What outcomes do they themselves value?

  5. What are their current expectations for themselves?

  6. Are our expectations for our learners reflected in their achievements?

Source: Adapted from the Ministry of Education, New Zealand Curriculum Update – The principle of high expectations

Investigate students’ expectations
Supporting students ambitions (NZ) (video)
Personalised, relevant support

Katrina talks about her ambition to become a kindergarten teacher.

She describes how the school is supporting her to achieve this goal.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Supporting students ambitions (NZ)

Resources and downloads

The principle of high expectations – New Zealand Curriculum Update 22

This curriculum update supports school to explore and enact the curriculum principle of high expectations. This principle empowers all student to achieve personal excellence, regardless of their individual circumstances.

16 and 17 year old learners ‘at risk’ of low achievement and poor outcomes

Research commissioned by the Ministry of Education to explore the achievements and transitions of 16- and 17-year-old students with moderate special education needs.

It’s not all black and white: The transition of students with dyslexia into the first year of university study

This thesis examines the experiences of four students with dyslexia at one New Zealand university. The ways in which the students frame their understanding of dyslexia and how this affects their approach to learning at university are examined.

Consider Universal Design for Learning

Removing barriers and planning for engagement

UDL helps teachers to develop more flexible and supportive learning environments. With options and supports built in at the outset, students can personalise their learning experiences so that they work for them.

The three principles of UDL give teachers and students a shared language to talk about options to support:

  • engagement and sustained motivation
  • the design of inclusive, flexible materials and resources
  • the design of inclusive tasks, activities, success criteria, assessment processes, and teaching methods.

Discover more about using a UDL approach in the Universal Design for Learning guide.

Consider Universal Design for Learning
What helps me learn (NZ) (video)
Strategies to increase engagement

A student with dyslexia describes how teachers can support his learning.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

What helps me learn (NZ)
Create inclusive classrooms
  1. Ask students how they like to learn.

  2. Use students’ cultural connections, interests, and strengths as bases for teaching.

  3. Eliminate situations that students may find difficult or embarrassing because of their physical or cognitive differences.

  4. Feedback success to students’ parents and whānau.

  5. Use students’ languages.

  6. Pick up on concerns about a student’s well-being.

  7. Recognise avoidance strategies and provide support and encouragement.

  8. Give students extra time to complete work.

  9. Make learning supports, such as text-to-speech and word prediction, available to all students.

  10. Enable students to show their strengths and contribute their ideas in collaborative work, without the challenge of lengthy writing tasks.

  11. Provide the student with strategies to help them when they get stuck.

Create inclusive classrooms
Why the need for flexibility?

... learners differ markedly in the ways in which they can be engaged or motivated to learn ...

Some learners are highly engaged by spontaneity and novelty while others are disengaged, even frightened, by those aspects, preferring strict routine. Some learners might like to work alone, while others prefer to work with their peers.

In reality, there is not one means of engagement that will be optimal for all learners in all contexts; providing multiple options for engagement is essential.

Source: Alberta Regional Consortia: National Center on Universal Design for Learning – Principle Ⅲ
Why the need for flexibility?

Resources and downloads

Multiple means of engagement - Engagement Checkpoints Unfolding in a Classroom

These videos and supporting resources from the Alberta UDL Summer Institute 2011 relate to the principle of multiple means of engagement.

Identify hidden barriers (video)
Removing barriers in assessment design

Use UDL principles to surface barriers that may impact on students’ ability to demonstrate their understanding.

View transcript

Source: CAST (Centre of Special Technologies) (US)

Identify hidden barriers
The barrier of handwriting (video)
Provide students with options

A student with dyslexia describes how technology removes barriers to demonstrating his understanding.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education inclusive education videos (NZ)

The barrier of handwriting
Offer options and supports
  1. Make supports and options available to everyone.

  2. Where possible, set success criteria that enable students to demonstrate their understanding in multiple ways.

  3. Offer students a range of options for expressing ideas and demonstrating understanding – text, images, voice, video, animation or a combination of media.

  4. Ensure that the means of showing understanding is not itself a barrier to success. For example, “to pass this assessment you have to speak in front of the class”.

  5. If assessments require a written response, offer students tools and supports such as text-to-speech, word prediction, keyboard access for typing, graphic organisers, and planners.

  6. Support students to break down tasks and manage their time so that they can complete assessments in the required time.

  7. Offer extended time to complete tasks.

Offer options and supports
Effective assessment practice

Recommendations for effective assessment practices:

  1. Students are provided with courses that reflect their aspirations, interests, abilities, and needs.

  2. There is a transparent process for students to appeal assessment decisions.

  3. Teachers have mentoring conversations with students and provide course guidance that gives transparent information about relevant assessment pathways.

  4. Teachers provide students with pathways towards qualifications, certificates, and endorsements.

Effective assessment practice
Consider students diverse needs

Ensure teachers provide equitable access for students who: 

  1. use special assessment conditions

  2. have English as a second language

  3. need support in literacy and/or numeracy

  4. are gifted and talented or accelerated

  5. need supported learning

  6. arrive or leave during the year.

Source: NZQA: Effective practice in schools

Consider students diverse needs

Resources and downloads

Using UDL to accurately assess student progress

This chapter explains how UDL can help to increase the accuracy and fairness of classroom assessment. Although this is a US context, the information is relevant to New Zealand schools.

Effective practice in schools

This is an overview of effective assessment that ensures results reported to NZQA are credible. It includes examples of how schools effect this. It also outlines the support students can expect to receive.

Special assessment conditions

NZQA information guide for school and families on Special Assessment Conditions.

Adopting flexible timetabling (NZ) (video)
System fits the students

Two schools restructured their timetables to meet the diverse aspriations of students as they prepare for their futures.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Ministry of Education Vocational Pathways

Adopting flexible timetabling (NZ)
Matching credits to skills (NZ) (video)
Increasing options for success

As Head of Department Performing Arts, Manu Fa'aea-Semeatu supported Pasifika students’ abilities and aspirations by designing personalised courses in years 11–13.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Ed Talks Core Education (NZ)

Matching credits to skills (NZ)
Responding to student aspirations

When Jack’s school became aware in year 13 that Jack intended to continue on to university, he received support and encouragement.

He was put into the top English class with a teacher who spent extra time going over essay structure and giving Jack the tools for getting his ideas down clearly.

Maths, which continues to be an area of weakness, became a target subject to ensure that Jack had the appropriate numeracy credits for University Entrance.

Source: It’s not all black and white: The transition of students with dyslexia into the first year of university study. Massey University, NZ.
Responding to student aspirations
Flexible NCEA pathways (NZ) (video)
Finding a pathway

Help them identify options and pathways that match their interests and needs.

No captions or transcript available

Source: NZ Curriculum Online

Flexible NCEA pathways (NZ)
Independent Learning Centre (video)
Flexible support

At Alfriston College's Independent Learning Centre, any student can study independently, access support for learning, goal setting, and researching future options.

View transcript

Source: JustJiekai

Independent Learning Centre

Resources and downloads

Information for educators – NCEA Level 2 achievement, retention, transitions

This booklet for teachers outlines the range of supports available to teachers and students through the Ministry of Education Achievement 2013–17 initiative.

River groups: a model (NZ)

At Hauraki Plains College, teachers and support staff play an active role in mentoring and supporting students in their learning, using the concept of river groups. The approach is proving to be a successful way to lift achievement, ensure success, and support students to plan for life beyond school.

The following two videos outline teacher and student perspectives on the approach:

Read more about the background to the approach in Supporting future-oriented learning & teaching — a New Zealand perspective

River groups: a model (NZ)
Whānau tutor groups (NZ) (video)
Rationale for vertical tutor groups

To ensure every student is well known by somebody, Hillmorton High School has moved to smaller vertical mentoring groups.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Ministry of Education TKI

Whānau tutor groups (NZ)
Mentors support coherence
(image)
ants058c2
Coordinate student-centred support

Effective transition support is a collaboration.

Mentors can ensure communication and information sharing is timely and coherent.

Source: Michael F. Giangreco

Mentors support coherence
Areas for professional learning

Lack of information is one of the greatest barriers to successful transition.

School staff with comprehensive, up-to-date knowledge of community support options can be valuable conduits of information for the student and their family/whānau.

Areas where staff could consider developing their knowledge of community-based support options include: supported living, employment, community participation, disability support, transport and further study options.

Ministry of Education ; Source: National Transition Guidelines
Areas for professional learning
Flex time: a model (US) (video)
Student and teacher collaboration

Innovation in timetabling allows a high school to introduce flex time. Students make decisions about what they learn and who they learn from.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Parkland School Division (US)

Flex time: a model (US)
Make connections for students (image)
This is an image of the cover of the Vocational Pathways tool: Programme design self review
Increasing relevancy

A tool to support self review of your teaching and Level 2 programme design to increase relevant options for students.

Source: Ministry of Education Vocational Pathways

Make connections for students
Linking careers to learning (NZ) (video)
Making connections explicit

Careers NZ offers some suggestions for ways to link careers education to the classroom.

View transcript

Source: Careers NZ (NZ)

Linking careers to learning (NZ)
Real-world internal assessment resources

Explore NZQA quality-assured assessment resources to support internally assessed Level 1 and Level 2 registered achievement standards for:

Source: Ministry of Education Vocational Pathways

Real-world internal assessment resources
Authentic work experience (NZ) (video)
Student reflections

A student with dyslexia reflects on her experience of learning in a commercial environment.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Enabling e-Learning (NZ)

Authentic work experience (NZ)

Resources and downloads

Programmes not subjects

Ian Reid explains how many young people need someone to help them connect the different parts of their school learning programme to the world of tertiary study or work.

NZTA secondary curriculum resources

These road safety resources support teachers with students in year 9 and above to plan teaching and learning aligned to The New Zealand Curriculum. NCEA Level 1 and 2 assessment resources are included. These have been certified by NZQA.

NCEA credits for driver licences

NZQA Information about opportunities for students to obtain NCEA credits by obtaining their driver’s licence.

Between school and life

Nine short videos on how all teachers can engage their students in career conversations. They are excerpts from a lecture to secondary school teacher trainees at the University of Auckland.

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Helping students identify aspirations and implement plans to achieve them

Personalise support for students as they plan their steps beyond school. Expect students’ needs and preferences to be diverse and provide options that are flexible.

A student describes how the flexible approach of her school’s learning support team is enabling her to pursue her dreams and prepare for the future.

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Closed captioning available in player

Suggestions and resources

Sample learner profile (image)
An example of a learner profile
Who am I?

A learner profile can be created in any format that works for the student, including:

  • text with photos
  • a slide presentation with a series of photos
  • a video
  • a blog.

Source: Ministry of Education

Sample learner profile
Using e-portfolios

A student’s portfolio can inform planning for the future and the transition from school. It can be used as, or help inform, a student’s curriculum vitae. It may include:

  1. evidence of the student’s learning at school and their achievements and activities outside school

  2. school reports

  3. certificates of achievement and participation

  4. work experience assessments, tertiary courses undertaken

  5. photographs, video clips

  6. a summary of the educational settings attended

  7. references and other relevant information.

Source: adpated from newzealanders.org – A website for the disability community

Using e-portfolios
Including family aspirations (NZ) (video)
Involving families in transitions

A learning support HoD describes how an online portfolio enables aspirations to be shared easily.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Including family aspirations (NZ)
Documenting work placements (image)
A student developing building skills
Illustrating experience for employers

In their final two years of school, support students to take photos to add to their portfolios.

Source: Ministry of Education

Documenting work placements

Resources and downloads

My future, my choice

This personal profile and transition from school action plan is a PowerPoint template developed by Bath and Northeast Council.

Supporting student advocacy

Support students to:

  1. explain their learning needs and preferences to others

  2. describe teaching approaches and resources that may be barriers to learning

  3. understand and articulate their rights and how to advocate for them

  4. find out about, and access, available supports and resources.

Source: Adapted from Rowan, L. M. (2010). It’s not all black and white: The transition of students with dyslexia into the first year of university study. Massey University (page 94).

Supporting student advocacy
Student story (NZ) (video)
Knowing what I need

Ben talks about the importance of advocating for his learning needs.

He emphasises the need to develop self-management and organisational skills for tertiary study.

View transcript

Source: BLENNZ (NZ)

Student story (NZ)
Describing a medical condition (NZ) (video)
Retinitis Pigmentosa: a student perspective

A student shows how he makes his eye condition understandable to others.

View transcript

Source: BLENNZ

Describing a medical condition (NZ)
Describing learning preferences (NZ) (video)
Dyslexia – how teachers can help

A student with dyslexia describes how teachers can support his learning and well-being.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Describing learning preferences (NZ)
An interconnected process (image)
MOE Transition to Adulthood Diagram Web2
Preparing students to leave secondary school

Many interrelated aspects need to be considered as each student prepares for leaving school. These are an integral part of the purpose of the curriculum.

Source: Ministry of Education

An interconnected process
Areas for support

Discuss with students specific areas they will need to consider over time:

  1. Identifying their strengths, skills, interests, and aspirations for the future

  2. Selecting a vocational/academic pathway at school to realise their aspirations

  3. Identifying the training options available, for example, university, polytechnic, apprenticeships

  4. Utilising government and community resources such as Gateway, STAR, the Youth Guarantee Scheme, and Careers NZ

  5. Understanding how to go about finding work

  6. Investigating taking a gap year, travel, or personal development options

  7. Identifying and acquiring specific skills and competencies, for example, time management skills

  8. Identifying barriers and the supports needed to overcome these.

Areas for support
Introducing online planning tools

5 steps to help students get started on their decision making

  1. Occupation Outlook: An app which introduces education, employment, and income information Android link

  2. Vocational Profile: A tool to track your progress towards achieving NCEA Level 2 with Vocational Pathways

  3. Profile Builder: A tool outlining study options and ways to build Vocational Pathways

  4. Careers NZ: A website of careers advice, tools, and tips

  5. Youth Guarantee: A website that outlines study options beyond school.

Source: Vocational Pathways booklet

Introducing online planning tools

Resources and downloads

Career kete: dream and discover

Resource kit to support students in years 7–8 to gain awareness of themselves and their futures and prepare for the move to secondary school.

Career kete: Explore and compare

Resource kit to support students in years 9–10 to make subject choices through a process of learning and career planning.

Career kete: Decide and prepare

Resource kit to support to help students in years 11–13 to make choices about tertiary education and work and prepare for the move from school.

Career malaga

A career-planning resource to support Pasifika secondary students planning their career journeys. Students are encouraged to think about who they are – their cultural identity, their special interests, and their strengths, and how these can lead to fulfilling futures.

I’m not sure what I want to do

This is a step-by-step guide from Careers NZ to help students understand who they are and what they want – from both work and life.

Transitioning from high school to college

This is a transition-to-college checklist for students, developed by The International Dyslexia Association. Although published for a US audience, it is useful in a New Zealand context.

My future, my choice

This personal profile and transition from school action plan is a PowerPoint template developed by Bath and Northeast Council.

Leaving school checklist

This is a practical checklist for young people who are leaving school.

Connect with students regularly (image)
Student talking to a teacher
Personalised support

Students identify the positive impact of having an adult who believes in them, looks out for them, has high expectations for them, and is available when they need support.

Source: Ministry of Education

Connect with students regularly
Connect students to supporters

Being connected to the community is vital to well-being. The community can be family or whānau, friends, neighbours, people from local clubs, advocacy groups, or support workers.

Help the student and their family or whānau to identify people who could:

  • be good advocates and allies
  • provide practical help (with transport, for example)
  • help solve problems
  • be a mentor
  • connect them to others with similar experiences
  • support them to find relevant information
  • be good listeners.
Connect students to supporters
Tools to manage anxiety

Sometimes students don’t want to talk. As an alternative, introduce students to resources and tools that can help them manage their anxiety or feelings of being overwhelmed or stuck.

  1. SPARX is an online e-therapy tool provided by the University of Auckland. SPARX helps young people learn skills to deal with feeling depressed or stressed.

  2. The Lowdown has a leaving-school section that offers a choice of actions students can take to manage their anxiety as they approach leaving school.

  3. How’s it going app is a tool developed by CCS Disability Action to help people take a step back and look at their life and how they're feeling. Students can use the statements, express themselves, and use the information to help generate a conversation.

Tools to manage anxiety
Circles of support

For me to be happy and not lonely, I need help from good friends. So I have a circle of support and they’re called The Young Champs.

The Young Champs is a group of very special people who’re there for me. Every two months, we have a meeting and I organise them. I wrote them a letter asking if they could help me with my goals.

I wanted people who were funny, helpful, friendly, honest, supportive, and smart. We have dinner that I cook and then have our meeting and talk about ME.

I’m very blessed to have good people in my life. They’re all there for me and it feels good.

My champs make sure that I’m in charge of my life and are there to help me. My champs and my family are all behind me so that makes me feel very strong. They really listen to me.

Source: A young adult’s guide to flatting
Circles of support
Fostering resilience

Build an understanding of what supports students’ resilience

  1. Control: Young people who understand that privileges and respect are earned through demonstrated responsibility will learn to make wise choices and feel a sense of control.

  2. Competence: Give young people opportunities to develop competence. We undermine competence when we don't allow students to recover themselves after a fall.

  3. Confidence: Young people need confidence to be able to navigate the world, think outside the box, and recover from challenges.

  4. Connection: Connections with other people, schools, and communities offer young people the security that allows them to stand on their own and develop creative solutions.

  5. Character: Young people need a clear sense of right and wrong and a commitment to integrity.

  6. Contribution: Young people who contribute to the well-being of others receive gratitude. They learn that contributing feels good and may therefore more easily turn to others.

  7. Coping: Young people who possess a variety of healthy coping strategies will be less likely to turn to dangerous quick fixes when stressed.

Source: Adapted from The 7 Cs: The Essential Building Blocks of Resilience

Fostering resilience

Resources and downloads

Youth Service – Providers by region

This site provides links to youth services that offer one-to-one coaching for students in work and study options. It also lists health and social support services.

Ministry of Social Development National Contracts Advisors

This is a list of contact details for the providers in your area who can support students with low-to-moderate learning needs as they transition from school to adulthood.

School and jobs

This site provides support tips for teenagers as they manage school and move to life beyond school. It focuses on strategies for reducing stress and thinking ahead.

The Low Down

The Lowdown website offers a choice of actions students can take to manage their anxiety. It has a section dedicated to issues around school and leaving school.

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Introducing students to the skills and competencies needed to realise their future plans

Offer students multiple opportunities within the curriculum to identify and develop the skills and competencies they will need in their lives beyond school.

Students will need to develop a wide range of skills and competencies.

 

Suggestions and resources

Tertiary skills checklist (image)
Questions about adult life presented in speech bubbles
Tertiary study and survival skills

Consider, with the students, some of the things they will need to think about as they prepare for tertiary study.

Source: Adapted from Preparing for adulthood: My friends, relationships, and community. Bath and East Somerset Council UK

Tertiary skills checklist
A student perspective (video)
Asperger's syndrome and university

A student with Asperger’s syndrome talks about going to university and how she manages challenges and opportunities.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Katie Stanbridge (UK)

A student perspective
Maximising technologies (NZ) (video)
Developing skills to support independence

Ben talks about the technologies that support his learning at university.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: BLENNZ (NZ)

Maximising technologies (NZ)
Managing time and commitments

Personal organisation and time management are core skills at tertiary level. Introduce students to technologies and systems that students can begin using while still at school.

  1. Encourage students to use their mobile devices to schedule alerts and reminders for regular and novel events and task deadlines.

  2. Model how to make graphic organisers and flow charts to support planning and thinking.

  3. Explore tools such as Trello to help students structure tasks and break them into smaller manageable ones.

  4. Model how to sync calendars between mobile devices.

Source: The good schools guide

Managing time and commitments
What's student life like? (NZ) (video)
Student perspectives

Students talk about their experiences of studying  and adjusting to student life.

Useful as a prompt for discussion.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Careers NZ (NZ)

What's student life like? (NZ)

Resources and downloads

Resources and support

This pamphlet from the University of Otago Disability and Support Service, which provides learning support, advice, advocacy, and information to students with permanent, recurring, or temporary impairments, is an example of learning support services provided by a university.

Transitioning from high school to college

This is a transition-to-college checklist for students, developed by The International Dyslexia Association. Although published for a US audience, it is useful in a New Zealand context.

It’s not all black and white: The transition of students with dyslexia into the first year of university study

This thesis examines the experiences of four students with dyslexia at one New Zealand university. The ways in which the students frame their understanding of dyslexia and how this affects their approach to learning at university are examined.

Job hunting checklist (image)
Questions about searching for work presented in speech bubbles
Work searching skills

Consider, with the students, some of the things they will need to think about as they prepare for job searching.

Source: Adapted from Preparing for adulthood: My friends, relationships, and community. Bath and East Somerset Council UK

Job hunting checklist
Job hunting skills

Introduce students to tools on the Careers NZ job hunting page that will help them as they apply for work:

  • Finding work – how to increase chances of finding a job
  • CVs and cover letters – how to write an effective CV and cover letter
  • Interviews – information about interview preparation, interview tests, and questions you can ask your interviewer
  • Job offers – what to consider before accepting a job or signing an employment agreement.
Job hunting skills
Managing time and commitments

Personal organisation and time management are core skills at tertiary level. Introduce students to technologies and systems that students can begin using while still at school.

  1. Encourage students to use their mobile devices to schedule alerts and reminders for regular and novel events and task deadlines.

  2. Model how to make graphic organisers and flow charts to support planning and thinking.

  3. Explore tools such as Trello to help students structure tasks and break them into smaller manageable ones.

  4. Model how to sync calendars between mobile devices.

Source: The good schools guide

Managing time and commitments
Know your skills guide (image)
Know your skills
A practical guide from Careers NZ

This is an online learning module designed to support young people identify their skills.

Source: Careers NZ

Know your skills guide
Skills employers value

Discuss with students the top 10 skills that Business NZ report employers look for, and how they can develop them:

  1. communication skills

  2. customer service skills – in person, on the phone, and online

  3. ability to work well in a team

  4. literacy and numeracy skills

  5. confidence learning about and using computers and technology

  6. planning and organisational skills

  7. initiative and a can-do attitude

  8. problem-solving skills

  9. good work habits and independence

  10. health and safety skills.

Source: Careers NZ

Skills employers value

Resources and downloads

Literacy job profiles

These literacy on the job profiles describe the main literacy and numeracy tasks in various jobs and explain how frequently they are used. These profiles can help you and your learners understand the literacy and numeracy skills required in authentic contexts.

Skillswise – Jobs skills

This BBC website supports the development of practical English and maths skills for work. Each section is illustrated with a two minute video and a set of online maths games and quizzes.

Know your skills guide

This is an online learning module designed to support young people preparing for the world of work.

Know your CV guide

This is an online learning module designed to support young people develop their CV.

The Learning Progressions

This resource explains how to identify the cognitive demands of course materials and tasks. Texts and tasks can be “mapped” against the progressions to show the skill or knowledge that a person needs to successfully use the text or complete the task. From the National Centre of Literacy and Numeracy for Adults.

A suite of short films revealing life’s essential information

A selection of videos developed by Deaf Aotearoa giving useful information about everyday life situations. Topics include: finding work, going flatting and health support.

Care-of-self checklist (image)
Questions about well-being presented in speech bubbles
Self care, health, social support, and well-being skills

Consider, with the students, some of the things they will need to think about to support their well-being.

Source: Adapted from Preparing for adulthood: My friends, relationships, and community Bath and East Somerset Council UK

Care-of-self checklist
Planning for social support

Support students to develop the social side of their transition plan. Pose questions such as:

  1. Do I need more information about housing options?

  2. Who is important to me?

  3. How will I keep in touch with my friends when I leave school?

  4. Are there new things I would like to try?

  5. What skills do I need to learn to support my independence?

  6. What places and activities are important to me?

Source: Preparing for adulthood: My friends, relationships, and community. Bath and East Somerset Council, UK

Planning for social support
Tools to manage anxiety

Sometimes students don’t want to talk. As an alternative, introduce students to resources and tools that can help them manage their anxiety or feelings of being overwhelmed or stuck.

  1. How’s it going app is a tool developed by CCS Disability Action to help people take a step back and look at their life and how they're feeling. Students can use the statements, express themselves, and use the information to help generate a conversation.

  2. SPARX is an online e-therapy tool provided by the University of Auckland. SPARX helps young people learn skills to deal with feeling depressed or stressed.

  3. The Lowdown has a leaving-school section that offers a choice of actions students can take to manage their anxiety as they approach leaving school.

Tools to manage anxiety
Dealing with stress (video)
Discuss options for practical supports

US students discuss and plan for dealing with stress at college.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: krburder (US)

Dealing with stress

Resources and downloads

It’s not all black and white: The transition of students with dyslexia into the first year of university study

This thesis examines the experiences of four students with dyslexia at one New Zealand university. The ways in which the students frame their understanding of dyslexia and how this affects their approach to learning at university are examined.

The Low Down

The Lowdown website offers a choice of actions students can take to manage their anxiety. It has a section dedicated to issues around school and leaving school.

Exploring futures: Your step-by-step guide to moving on

This booklet for young people with the experience of disability and their families in the Greater Wellington region provides support for the transition from school to adult life.

Independent living checklist (image)
Questions about living independently presented in speech bubbles
Independent living skills

Consider, with the students, some of the things they will need to think about for living independently.

Source: Adapted from Preparing for adulthood: My friends, relationships, and community Bath and East Somerset Council UK

Independent living checklist
Budgeting skills for flatting

Introduce students to this resource from the Sorted website, which focuses on how to manage expenses when living in a flat or hostel.

  1. Paying rent

  2. Food and living costs

  3. Sorting out the bills

  4. Get insurance

  5. What happens when you leave the flat

  6. If things go wrong

Source: Sorted website

Budgeting skills for flatting

Resources and downloads

Budgeting tool

This is an online budgeting tool created by Sorted.

Cost of living calculator

This is an online budgeting tool created by Study Link.

A young adult’s guide to flatting

This guide for people with disabilities preparing to go flatting is aimed at people with high needs, but many of the strategies and considerations are useful for all.

Moving out of home

Information from Youthline on things to consider when moving out of home

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Personalising support for students as they explore work and study opportunities and options

Open the doors to a wide range of options that students can consider. Provide students with extended opportunities to explore unfamiliar contexts and build relationships beyond the school community

It’s good to feel what it’s like so I can believe it

Student ; Source: Education Review Office (ERO)

Suggestions and resources

Offer extended experiences (image)
Ready for Working Party
Personalising placements

Some students may take more time to adjust to new contexts.

Liaise with providers of work experience for extended time so students can really become comfortable in an unfamiliar workplace and role.

Source: Ministry of Education

Offer extended experiences
Māori and Pasifika trades training (NZ) (video)
Iwi-led partnerships

Providing culturally specific options recognises the diverse contexts from which we all come.

Ensure students know about local Māori and Pasifika trades training programmes.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (NZ)

Māori and Pasifika trades training (NZ)
Student-to-student storytelling (video)
Stories from past students

Introduce students to first-hand stories from the workplace.

Invite past students to school or explore stories on the Youth Guarantee website.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Youth Guarantee website (NZ)

Student-to-student storytelling
Investigating options

Some considerations include:

  1. Gateway

  2. STAR

  3. Youth Guarantee

  4. Careers NZ

Source: National transition guidelines for specialist educators, schools and parents

Investigating options

Resources and downloads

Education and training: Transition

This directory of services for students with learning support needs and disabilities supports their transition from school. Currently the information is focused on the Canterbury region.

Jobs database

This database provides a wide range of information on career possibilities and the job market.

Information for educators – NCEA Level 2 achievement, retention, transitions

This booklet for teachers outlines the range of supports available to teachers and students through the Ministry of Education Achievement 2013–17 initiative.

Ministry of Social Development National Contracts Advisors

This is a list of contact details for the providers in your area who can support students with low-to-moderate learning needs as they transition from school to adulthood.

Student disability services (image)
Screen Shot 2016 07 07 at 10.07.20 AM
A resource for all students

Many students may not know that most tertiary institutions have a learning support base available to them. Share this video with students to give them some insight to what is on offer.

Source: University of Auckland

Student disability services
Funding information

Explore with students information about funding available for study and training for work.

Fees-free scheme  provides for up to two years of full-time study for vocationally focused training programmes for 16–19 year olds, free of charge. It is available for study to obtain Levels 1 to 3 qualifications at certificate level and for foundation skills in trades, business, or cultural areas.

Funding information
Disability services at universities
Disability services at universities
Investigating tertiary institutions

When choosing a learning institution, support the student to investigate:

  • trying out courses
  • loans
  • the disability service at the chosen institution
  • training allowances and funds
  • the location, relative to home, family, and relatives
  • the size of the institution and the need for interaction with tutors
  • the atmosphere and other students’ experiences at this place.
Investigating tertiary institutions
Visiting tertiary providers

It’s good to feel what it’s like so I can believe it.

Student ; Source: Education Review Office (ERO)
Visiting tertiary providers

Resources and downloads

Education and training: Transition

This directory of services for students with learning support needs and disabilities supports their transition from school. Currently the information is focused on the Canterbury region.

Resources and support

This pamphlet from the University of Otago Disability and Support Service, which provides learning support, advice, advocacy, and information to students with permanent, recurring, or temporary impairments, is an example of learning support services provided by a university.

Community-based support

Encourage students to find out about community-based support options.

Introduce them to:

  • publications that provide local information on transition options, vocational training, and support services (for example, Exploring Futures).
  • the Citizen’s Advice Bureau
  • the local Youth Service
  • relevant disability support agencies.
Community-based support
Community groups

Discuss with students areas of interest and areas where they may need support while at school and in the future. Support students to investigate local community groups, clubs, and agencies that they may not yet know about.

Discuss:

  • cultural groups (for example, kapa haka)
  • sporting and hobby clubs
  • volunteering
  • assistive equipment
  • money and benefits
  • budgeting advice
  • health needs
  • housing options
  • transport.
Community groups
Identifying supporters

Being connected to the community is vital to well-being. The community can be family or whānau, friends, neighbours, people from local clubs, or support workers. Discuss with the student and their family or whānau who could:

  • be good advocates and allies
  • provide practical help (with transport, for example)
  • help solve problems
  • be a mentor
  • support them to find relevant information about work, study, living independently, and social groups in the community
  • be good listeners.
Identifying supporters

Resources and downloads

Whāia te ao mārama: The Māori disability action plan for disability support services 2012 to 2017

This action plan establishes priority areas of action to enable Māori disabled to achieve their aspirations and to reduce barriers that may impede them reaching their goals.

A young adult’s guide to flatting

This guide for people with disabilities preparing to go flatting is aimed at people with high needs, but many of the strategies and considerations are useful for all.

Ministry of Social Development National Contracts Advisors

This is a list of contact details for the providers in your area who can support students with low-to-moderate learning needs as they transition from school to adulthood.

YouthLaw Aotearoa

This is a free national legal service for people under 25 years old.

Your guide to disability support services

This website provides access to English, Samoan, Tongan and Cook Island Māori guides on disability services in New Zealand.

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