Welcome to Inclusive Education.


Leading schools that include all learners

http://inclusive.tki.org.nz/guides/leading-schools-that-include-all-learners/

Manaakitanga, leading with moral purpose, underpins the commitment that leaders have to ensuring that the school’s culture, systems, policies and practices at every level are shaped by the best interests of all students.

This guide unpacks what it means to lead an inclusive school where all students are supported to be present, engaged, participating, and achieving in ways that honour and value diversity.

 

Leading with moral purpose

Leading with moral purpose for inclusion (manaakitanga) involves leaders understanding their role as the kaiarataki – strategic leaders who advocate for realising the potential and success of all students.

The educational leadership model in Kiwi Leadership for Principals (2008) and Leading from the Middle (2012) sets out the qualities, knowledge, and skills leaders need to lead in 21st century schools for all learners.

Source: Educational Leaders (NZ)

Suggestions and resources

School leaders talk (NZ) (video)
Learning better together

Leaders talk about how they have supported the development of inclusive practices in their school.

No captions or transcript available

Source: IHC (NZ)

School leaders talk (NZ)
Universal design approach (image)
What benefits people with special needs benefits everyone
Maximising access, minimising barriers for all

Clearing the ramp is a universal approach. Everyone's needs and potential barriers are identified at the outset. Solutions maximise access and opportunity for all.

Consider how to build universal solutions and approaches into your school’s culture, systems, policies and practices at every level.

Source: Michael Giangreco

Universal design approach
Defining inclusive schools

An inclusive school is one where all students feel they belong because they are welcome to enrol at their local school (are present) and are able to take part in all aspects of school life (participate and are engaged).

Inclusive schools:

  • value every individual
  • respect diversity
  • provide equitable opportunities for all students
  • recognise and meet the learning needs of all students.

Source: Success for All – Every school, every child, Ministry of Education 2014

Defining inclusive schools
Collective responsibility

Collective responsibility is a defining feature of many of the world’s highest performing educational systems … where all teachers feel responsible for all students’ success.

Collective responsibility means more than just planning collaboratively or sharing good practice. It is about having a common professional and emotional investment in, and mutual professional accountability for, the success of all students across all grade levels, subject departments, and the special educational divide.

Source: Leading for All, A. Hargreaves and H. Braun
Collective responsibility
Principles of inclusive schools

The most inclusive schools operate under three key principles:

  1. having ethical standards and leadership that build the culture of an inclusive school

  2. having well-organised systems, effective teamwork, and constructive relationships that identify and support the inclusion of all students

  3. using innovative and flexible practices to meet the diverse needs of all students.

Source: adapted from: ERO report Including students with high needs

Principles of inclusive schools

Resources and downloads

Leadership in the development of inclusive school communities

An overview in Leading Lights magazine, Edition 3, 2013, of the research of Dr Jude McArthur and others into the experiences of young people with additional learning needs in schools. Key themes are connected to what school leaders can do to develop their schools as inclusive communities.

Success for All – Every school, Every child

This strategy has been developed to support the vision of a fully inclusive education system.

What an inclusive school looks like

This Ministry of Education information sheet describes what an inclusive school looks like and feels like. Use it to help reflect upon and review the inclusive values, policies, and practices in your school.

Inclusive practice in secondary schools: ideas for school leaders

A resource to support discussions about inclusive practice in secondary schools. Divided into 4 sections focussing on building an inclusive school culture; processes and systems, assessment and enhancing partnerships.

The meaning of inclusion? Index for Inclusion

This information informed the development of the UK’s Index of Inclusion.

What is our school culture like? – A checklist for analysing a school’s culture

This is a tool to analyse school culture. Data collected for this audit identifies a range of cultural issues, beliefs, practices, norms, and values as an initial step to evaluating how these might impact on student learning.

Including students with high needs – ERO indicator framework (July 2013) – Appendix 3: Inclusive schools

These useful indicators have been used by ERO to review the inclusive practices of schools in 2010, 2012, and 2014.

Wellbeing for success: a resource for schools

This Education Review Office (ERO) resource has been developed to help schools evaluate and improve student well-being. It highlights the need for systems, people, and initiatives to respond to wellbeing concerns for students who need additional support.

Shared responsibility for all learners (video)
The inclusive classroom – Martyn Rouse interview

Professor Martyn Rouse from the School of Education, University of Aberdeen, discusses how all teachers in a school are responsible for ensuring that it is inclusive. View the first minute.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Education Scotland (UK)

Shared responsibility for all learners
Distributed leadership and manaakitanga (NZ) (video)
The strengths of the group

Hurae White discusses how middle and senior leaders have a key role both in contributing to the building of a positive and inclusive whole school culture.

View transcript

Source: Educational Leaders (NZ)

Distributed leadership and manaakitanga (NZ)
What is distributed leadership?
  • Distributed leadership is not delegation. 
  • Distributed leadership is an organisational condition. 
  • Distributed leadership is promoted not mandated. 
  • Distributed leadership is inclusive.
  • Distributed leadership does not mean everybody leads.
  • Distributed leadership has many organisational configurations.

Source: Distributed leadership matters by Alma Harris

What is distributed leadership?
Example from Hillmorton High (NZ) (video)
Distributed leadership – Hillmorton High School

An example of distributed leadership in action.

No captions or transcript available

Source: He Kākano (NZ)

Example from Hillmorton High (NZ)
Explaining distributed leadership (video)
Alma Harris – Distributed Leadership?

Alma Harris, Professor of Educational Leadership at the Institute of Education, London explains why distributing leadership has a positive effect on outcomes for all students.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Alma Harris (UK)

Explaining distributed leadership

Resources and downloads

Leadership in the development of inclusive school communities

An overview in Leading Lights magazine, Edition 3, 2013, of the research of Dr Jude McArthur and others into the experiences of young people with additional learning needs in schools. Key themes are connected to what school leaders can do to develop their schools as inclusive communities.

Moral Purpose and shared leadership

This report into a study by Michael Bezzina looks at the role of shared moral purpose and shared leadership in supporting teachers to implement authentic learning.

Using Best Evidence Syntheses to assist in making a bigger difference for diverse learners

This paper by Adrienne Alton-Lee looks at which BES reports have particular relevance for school principals and makes practical suggestions for how school leaders might introduce findings from Quality Teaching for Diverse Students in Schooling: Best Evidence Synthesis (2003) to staff.

The authentic leader – An interview with Steve Mumby

This discussion focuses on the value of distributed leadership and shared accountability.

Inclusive practice at Onslow College (NZ) (video)
Developing inclusive practice at Onslow College

John Robinson, HoD Learning Support, explains the underpinning philosophy of inclusive practice at Onslow College.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Inclusive practice at Onslow College (NZ)
Supporting student aspirations (NZ) (video)
My dreams and future plans

Katrina, a student at Onslow College, talks about her ambition to become a kindergarten teacher, and how she is working toward achieving this goal.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Supporting student aspirations (NZ)
Student experiences (NZ) (video)
The impact of a school having high expectations

Past student and deputy head boy, Matt Frost, reflects on how his school supported his interests and maintained high expectations of his participation and achievement.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Te Toi Tupu (NZ)

Student experiences (NZ)
The impact of language (image)
The most appropriate label is usually the one someone’s parents have given them
Respectfully addressing all learners

At all times use "people first" language.

Words can shape our ideas, perceptions and attitudes about ourselves and others.

Adapted from Changing How We Talk About Disabilities (Alberta Education).

Source: Michael Giangreco

The impact of language
Finding my voice (NZ) (video)
Tihei

"We all got our best way of communicating, you got your way, I got my way.

Some people talk, some people write, some people sing. Me, I freestyle."

No captions or transcript available

Source: Loading Docs

Finding my voice (NZ)

Resources and downloads

The principle of high expectations – New Zealand Curriculum Update 22

This curriculum update supports school to explore and enact the curriculum principle of high expectations. This principle empowers all student to achieve personal excellence, regardless of their individual circumstances.

Changing How We Talk About Disabilities

A conversation guide addresses the importance of using respectful and positive language
when talking about students with disabilities. Developed by Alberta Education, Canada.

Kinds of participation: teacher and special education perceptions and practices of ‘inclusion’ in early childhood and primary school settings

This article looks at how labelling and language can lead to negative assumptions about disability and create barriers to learning.

Inclusive education video series

A webpage holding nine short videos from Alberta Education’s new inclusive education video series. Topics include valuing all students; changing how we talk about disabilities; using differentiated instruction to support all learners; making sense of Universal Design for Learning; using assistive technology to support learning; scaffolding for student success; using a positive behaviour approach to support learning; rethinking the role of educational assistants; and making sense of response to intervention. Each of the nine videos comes with a conversation guide.

The benefits of diversity (video)
Inclusive society

"If we want to make a more inclusive society, one that is equitable and just, ...

if you want your son or daughter to be more empathetic, to be a full human, she or he needs to be exposed to difference."

Mark Spooner

No captions or transcript available

Source: Inclusiveed (Canada)

The benefits of diversity
Addressing misconceptions (video)
Building understanding

Some parents may feel that children who need additional support to learn or have a disability may adversely impact on their child's learning.

Take time to mediate these concerns, addressing misconceptions and building understanding.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Canadian Association for Community Living (Canada)

Addressing misconceptions
Mediating parental concerns (image)
Responding to parent concerns2
Responding with a shared understanding

Develop a shared understanding of the values and beliefs that underpin inclusive practices in your school, and how you will address questions from parents.

Use the graphic as a prompt for discussions with staff.

Source: Ministry of Education

Mediating parental concerns
Gathering parent perspectives

There is no one approach to partnering with parents and whānau

Parents and whānau will have their own perspectives on disability and accessing support. Find out where they stand on important issues.

Consider:

  • their values and beliefs about disability
  • their experiences of learning
  • their hopes and dreams for their child
  • their fears and anxieties
  • their expectations around resourcing – for example, how teacher's aides are used, how much time their child is included in activities with their peers.

Where parent and whānau expectations differ from those of your school, be open to learning from parents. Create opportunities to connect parents and whānau with students, other parents, and community leaders. Let them see activities at your school, or at another school. Consider delivering presentations or workshops to parents and whānau.

Gathering parent perspectives

Resources and downloads

Education for All

This video, from the Ministry of Education, looks at how a number of New Zealand schools have worked collaboratively within their communities to meet the diverse needs of the students. The educators and families involved talk about their journeys and reflect on what they continue to learn.

Learning better together research DVD

This video outlines aspirations for school communities for the inclusion of all students in their schools.

FAQs on schooling for disabled children and young people

New Zealand’s Inclusive Education Action Group has developed this list of questions and answers about schooling for students with additional needs.

Changing How We Talk About Disabilities

A conversation guide addresses the importance of using respectful and positive language
when talking about students with disabilities. Developed by Alberta Education, Canada.

Inclusive practice in secondary schools: ideas for school leaders

A resource to support discussions about inclusive practice in secondary schools. Divided into 4 sections focussing on building an inclusive school culture; processes and systems, assessment and enhancing partnerships.

Partnerships at Lincoln School (NZ) (video)
Engaging whānau

Staff at Lincoln School talk about their commitment to working in partnership with whānau.

No captions or transcript available

Source: He Kākano (NZ)

Partnerships at Lincoln School (NZ)
Family centred approaches (image)
An unsuccessful family-centred approach
Family-centred approaches gone bad

Discuss with families ways of working together that respect diversity, are culturally responsive, and are inclusive of individual needs.

Source: Michael Giangreco

Family centred approaches
Parent perspective (NZ) (video)
Successful home-school partnerships: A parent perspective

Garth Clarricoats has a son has autism, who has recently completed year 13.

He reflects on what makes a successful home-school partnership.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Te Toi Tupu (NZ)

Parent perspective (NZ)
Gathering parent perspectives

There is no one approach to partnering with parents and whānau

Parents and whānau will have their own perspectives on disability and accessing support. Find out where they stand on important issues.

Consider:

  • their values and beliefs about disability and inclusion
  • their experiences of learning
  • their hopes and dreams for their child
  • their fears and anxieties
  • their expectations around resourcing – for example, how teacher’s aides are used, how much time their child is included in activities with their peers.

Where parent and whānau expectations differ from those of your school, be open to learning from parents. Create opportunities to connect parents and whānau with students, other parents, and community leaders. Let them see activities at your school, or at another school. Consider delivering presentations or workshops to parents and whānau.

 

Gathering parent perspectives
What partnership looks like

We are true partners when:

  1. you listen to what I have to say

  2. you acknowledge my intelligence

  3. you want to learn more about my ways

  4. you don’t judge me

  5. you engage me in genuine dialogue

  6. we make decisions together

  7. you show that my child matters to you

  8. you include my experience, knowledge and viewpoints with yours.

Source: The home-school partnership programme, 2003, cited in ERO’s Partners in Learning report – Findings from parents of students with special education needs

What partnership looks like

Resources and downloads

Curriculum Implementation Exploratory Studies: Final Report – Theme F: Engaging the community

This section from the Curriculum Implementation Exploratory Studies project focuses on the different purposes of community engagement. A key purpose is for schools to involve their community in developing a shared vision and values. Contains practical strategies.

Rangiātea: Hamilton Girls' High School

This Hamilton Girls' High School exemplar explores how using whānau tutor classes, vertical tutor classes, and mentoring built powerful educational relationships at the school.

Welcoming parents

This video includes practical suggestions for engaging Pasifika parents in the school community.

Partners in learning: Schools' engagement with parents, whānau, and communities (May 2008)

This report from the Education Review Office shows that effective partnerships between schools and parents, whānau, and communities can result in better outcomes for students.

Engaging parents, whānau, and community

This is a summary of research, which confirms that parents, whānau, and the community play an important role in children’s attitudes towards school and in helping teachers to better understand their students.

Victory Park community hub (video)
Multi-service, all-age approach

Victory Park Primary School enrolls the family, not just the child.

With the local community centre on the school grounds; health, social services and education work as one to support all menbers of a whānau.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Superu NZ

Victory Park community hub
Social worker perspective (NZ) (video)
Teenagers

Gary Veenstra, Child and Family Social worker with the Royal New Zealand Foundation for the Blind (RNZFB) talks about his work with teenagers.

NB: The RNZFB is now called the Blind Foundation.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: BLENNZ (NZ)

Social worker perspective (NZ)
Places to seek expertise

“School improvement evidence tells us that persistent and widespread disparities in achievement are best tackled through partnerships between leaders in schools and external expertise.

The Teacher Professional Learning and Development Best Evidence Synthesis found that school-based change, supported by capable external expertise, was a pattern found in many highly effective interventions."

Seek out expertise in inclusive practices from:

  • within your school
  • past students and families
  • resource teachers
  • local and national disability or specialist services
  • regional Ministry
  • PLD providers and consultants
  • online networks and communities
  • local and international conferences.

Source: School leadership and student outcomes: Identifying what works and why (p 64)

Places to seek expertise
Effective partnership strategies

At times students are supported by people and agencies outside of the school. These could be the Ministry of Education, the Ministry of Health, Child, Youth and Family (CYF) or non-governmental organisations that are contracted to support young people. 

Consider these practicalities:

  • The language of schools is often specialised and not commonly understood by people outside the sector. Consider how to support understanding.
  • Who will be the key contact person in the school?
  • Who will be the contact person in the agency?
  • Where can a student and/or family meet with someone from the outside agency? Do you need to book a space?
Effective partnership strategies
Community and cultural groups (image)
PASG Logo
Building relationships with local and cultural groups

Build relationships with local iwi and Pasifika cultural and disability groups, such as the Pasifika Autism Support Group. Invite representatives to make presentations at school. Encourage students to get involved in local projects. 

Source: Pasifika Autism Support Group

Community and cultural groups

Resources and downloads

Information for parents and caregivers of children with special education needs: Support organisations and useful contacts

A list of national organisations that support students with additional needs and their families, compiled by the Ministry of Education.

Inclusive practice in secondary schools: ideas for school leaders

A resource to support discussions about inclusive practice in secondary schools. Divided into 4 sections focussing on building an inclusive school culture; processes and systems, assessment and enhancing partnerships.

Back to top

Strategically resourcing for inclusive practices

Principals, with the support of effective boards of trustees, coordinate planned actions and resourcing (time, money, people) that maximises the effectiveness of school-wide inclusive practices, including harnessing expertise in the community.

These guidelines are a valuable resource for boards on how to show moral leadership and build an inclusive school with confidence.

Source: Effective Governance Publications and Resources (NZSTA) 

Suggestions and resources

Develop a learning support register

Suggestions for developing and using a register

  1. Be clear about the register's purpose, how it will be used, how what it tells you will be confidentially shared, and how and by whom it will be managed.

  2. Decide how you will identify students who need additional support and who can help with assessing student needs (internal and external individuals or agencies). Add information to your School Management System, if it supports this.

  3. Use the register to help identify areas of need and coordinate support across the school.

  4. Focus on learning needs to meet curriculum goals, to meet National Standards, or to achieve NCEA, social support, and support students might need at home.

  5. Use ongoing evaluations of data to inform professional learning and development focus areas, inclusive teaching approaches, and school-wide programmes.

  6. Establish a process and timeframe for monitoring and evaluating the progress of each student on the register.

Source: Planning and reporting guidance for secondary schools

Develop a learning support register
Curriculum related levels of support

Students working at or above the curriculum level for their age:

Students who need teaching adaptations and/or individualised support to access the curriculum and achieve at or above the curriculum level. They are likely to have access to a range of special education services and resources.

Students working at level one of the curriculum for most (possibly all) of their schooling:

Some students will learn within level 1 for most of their schooling in some or all of the learning areas. Others may not be learning at the same level as most of their peers but are learning within levels 1–8. An individual student may be working at different curriculum levels across different learning areas. Regardless of the level, all learning must be valued and recognised as progress. These students are likely to have Individual Education Plans and may be the recipients of ORS funding.

Students who need additional support to work at the curriculum level for their age:

Students who need effective teaching and accelerated teaching programmes to access the curriculum and achieve at the curriculum level for their age. They are likely to need short-term access to some special education services and resources.

Source: Ministry of Education

Curriculum related levels of support
National Administration Guidelines

National Administration Guideline (NAG) 1 requires all schools to identify their students who are at risk of not achieving

Specifically schools are required to:

NAG 1c. on the basis of good quality assessment information, identify students and groups of students:

i. who are not achieving

ii. who are at risk of not achieving

iii. who have special needs (including gifted and talented students), and

iv. aspects of the curriculum which require particular attention.

NAG 1d. develop and implement teaching and learning strategies to address the needs of students and aspects of the curriculum identified in (c) above.

Source: Ministry of Education

National Administration Guidelines
Caution with registers (image)
Students can move on and off the special needs register.
You can get in but you can’t get out

Students may move on and off the register of learning support needs as individual goals are met.

Source: Michael Giangreco

Caution with registers

Resources and downloads

Developing learner profiles

This document provides general support and guidance when developing a learner profile. It includes prompts and questions, along side purpose and benefits for students.

Charters and Analysis of Variance and Reporting: Guidance for schools using National Standards

This document is for schools with students in years 1 to 8 that use The New Zealand Curriculum. It provides suggestions and examples about how your board can:
develop the strategic and annual planning sections of your charter; analyse different types of student achievement information so you can set targets to improve student progress and achievement; report your student progress and achievement using National Standards, including information on how to report on students with special education needs, English language learners, and gifted and talented students; and develop and report your analysis of variance.

Charter and Analysis of Variance: Guidance for Secondary Schools

This document has an emphasis on increasing the number of young people leaving school with at least NCEA Level 2 or an equivalent qualification. This resource is primarily for schools with students in years 9-13.

Shared sense of purpose (video)
Shared vision for inclusion

Board of Trustee chairperson at Berhampore School talks about representing the aspirations and interest of the community to create an inclusive school.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Shared sense of purpose
What to show in charters

The school charter is the key planning document for your school

Outline how your school intends to become more inclusive and meet the needs of all students.

In your charter, show:

  • what your board wants to achieve for students with learning support needs
  • how you intend to achieve the outcomes for these students; for example, your teaching strategies, and how you are going to use your resourcing
  • what success will look like for students
  • how you will evaluate and assess your progress towards meeting your charter aims and targets and report this in your analysis of variance.

Examples of inclusive school charters:

What to show in charters
School charter focus areas

Examples of focus areas that schools have identified in their charters:

  1. Improving the enrolment practices for students with additional support needs.

  2. A school-wide programme of professional development focused on inclusive practices.

  3. A community engagement strategy that reflects a partnership approach with parents and whānau of all students.

  4. An accessibility audit: buildings and grounds throughout your school developed to support the participation of all students;  for example, ramps, lifts, equipment for students using wheelchairs, markings to help students navigate around the school.

  5. A pilot of flexible timetabling to support increased access to learning support expertise and collaborative teaching models.

School charter focus areas
Using register data

Make effective use of your register to identify students learning support needs. Work with your BoT to coordinate planned actions and resourcing.

  1. Identify areas of need from your register and coordinate support across the school. 

  2. Identify student learning needs to: meet curriculum goals, National Standards or achieve NCEA; provide social support; and identify support students might need at home.

  3. Think beyond the student to wider school processes, such as professional learning and development, inclusive teaching approaches, and school-wide programmes.

  4. Establish a process and timeframe for monitoring and evaluating the progress of each student on the register, and reporting to the BoT on this.

Using register data
Take a universal approach (image)
blue line
Maximise benefits for all students

The school painted pathways between focal points to support a student with low vision.

New students and those who need support with orientation also use the marked pathways.

Source: Glyne Lowe

Take a universal approach

Resources and downloads

Everyone’s included on the Rolly Express

Rolleston School Principal, Andrew Morrall, and Learning Support Coordinator, Kaye Cook, discuss why the school has decided to release the Learning Support Coordinator role from class teaching.

Makauri School charter

Ormond School charter

Charters and Analysis of Variance and Reporting: Guidance for schools using National Standards

This document is for schools with students in years 1 to 8 that use The New Zealand Curriculum. It provides suggestions and examples about how your board can:
develop the strategic and annual planning sections of your charter; analyse different types of student achievement information so you can set targets to improve student progress and achievement; report your student progress and achievement using National Standards, including information on how to report on students with special education needs, English language learners, and gifted and talented students; and develop and report your analysis of variance.

Getting to know learners and using e-portfolios

John Robinson, HoD learning Support at Onslow College, reflects on the impact of using ePortfolios to share learning beyond the classroom in this video.

Charter and Analysis of Variance: Guidance for Secondary Schools

This document has an emphasis on increasing the number of young people leaving school with at least NCEA Level 2 or an equivalent qualification. This resource is primarily for schools with students in years 9-13.

Research on effective PLD (NZ) (video)
Support what makes a difference

Combining careful assessment and analysis with pedagogical content knowledge has the most impact on student learning.

Support teachers to gain this knowledge through cycles of inquiry into their practice.

 

No captions or transcript available

Source: EDTalks (NZ)

Research on effective PLD (NZ)
Value and develop school-wide capacity
  • Create opportunities for staff to identify:
    • areas where students will need support based on ongoing data collection
    • immediate professional learning needs related to individual students, or teacher inquiry
    • areas of personal experience and knowledge that they are happy to share with colleagues
    • preferred learning pathways, for example, workshops, large meetings, one-to-one conversation, coaching and mentoring.
  • Investigate the breadth of community expertise, including present and past students, parents and whānau, local agencies.
  • Identify where there is synchronicity of need and experience and discuss ways to facilitate effective resourcing in partnership with staff.
  • Identify gaps in your school’s collective expertise and possible solutions, for example access to professional learning, support from an outside agency, or a whole school inquiry focus.
Value and develop school-wide capacity
Prioritise time for collaboration

In Reggio they talk about the gift of time – time for children to think and talk – and this also is how we try to work with staff.

If you value staff you have to find time for them to think and talk. You have to find clever ways for teachers to be released to have professional conversations, for example so that teachers can meet regularly with their teacher aides. The payoffs are massive.

Andrew Morrall, Principal, Rolleston Primary School ;
Prioritise time for collaboration
Seek feedback from staff (image)
Match supports to needs, Michael Giangreco cartoon
Meet the individual needs of staff in ways that work for them.

Offer teachers flexible professional support they can personalise to meet their immediate needs and learning preferences.

Seek feedback on what works and why.

Source: Michael Giangreco

Seek feedback from staff

Resources and downloads

Facilitating professional learning

Description for sub-resources: from the NZ Curriculum Online resource: Inclusive Practice and the School Curriculum

Samoan education leaders step up

This article from the Education Gazette reports on a Pasifika-led PLD initiative that is making a difference to the literacy achievement of Samoan students in Auckland.

Mangere East students can’t get enough of “Bobbie” maths

This article looks at an initiative of the Pasifika Success Project where maths is taught in a Pasifika context at Mangere East School.

Leading inquiry at a teacher level: it’s all about mentorship

This article is from Set: Research information for teachers. It is a well-grounded, practice-informed look at conditions that support teachers to be learners when they inquire into their practice. The importance of strong leadership is emphasised.

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Leading learning to support inclusive practices

How do we lead learning in inclusive practices “where everybody’s in and not excluded intentionally, by design, or unintentionally?” (Edgar Schmidt).

Edgar Schmidt discusses how to create a school district where everybody’s deliberately included.

Source:  Edmonton Public Schools (Canada)

Closed captioning available in player

Suggestions and resources

Model an inquiry approach (image)
A diagram of the professional learning and development cycle
Model teacher inquiry and knowledge building approaches

The principal is responsible for developing, maintaining, and reporting on an effective professional development and appraisal programme for all staff.

Source: Timperley, H. (2008). Teacher professional learning and development in The Educational Practices Series – 18. Ed. Jere Brophy. International Academy of Education & International Bureau of Education: Brussels (p 26).

Model an inquiry approach
Inclusive Practices Toolkits (image)
A diagram of the concepts and practices that underpin an inclusive school
Using the Inclusive Practices Tools for self-review

The Inclusive Practices Tools are designed to support schools to review their ongoing journey towards building inclusive practices for all learners.

Source: NZCER Wellbeing@school website

Inclusive Practices Toolkits
How the Inclusive Practices Tools work

The Inclusive Practices Tools and review process are designed to assist school staff to consider what inclusion means, and encourage schools to engage in a dialogue with their community to think critically about how best to support a diverse needs of all learners.

The Inclusive Practices Tools:

  • focus on practices, systems, and structures rather than conditions or disabilities
  • describe inclusive education practices as they apply to all students, while using examples that are drawn from research on common barriers experienced by students with additional learning needs or disabilities
  • use language that is inclusive of all students
  • aim to promote the view that the idea of inclusion applies to all students, and student diversity is a resource for learning.

Source: NZCER Wellbeing@school website

How the Inclusive Practices Tools work
Seek feedback past and present students (video)
Inquiring into inclusive practices

Seeking to understand the impact of its inclusive practices, Marylhurst University invited past and present students to provide feedback on how to increase inclusivity.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Marylhurst University (US)

Seek feedback past and present students
Seeking community-wide feedback

I think a key part of it was also getting students’ feedback and input. Teachers all completed a SWOT analysis and students gave us feedback about their aspirations, and areas that needed to improve in terms of their learning and achievement.

We also got feedback from parents.

Probably the most powerful was when – just through visiting homes and talking to parents, letting them know that we had a shared vision – that we knew that their children were capable and successful and wanted to work with them and wanted to seek their advice on how we could ensure that success.

Principal, Louise Anaru ;
Seeking community-wide feedback

Resources and downloads

Implementing an inclusive curriculum

from the NZ Curriculum Online resource: Inclusive Practice and the School Curriculum

Getting started with self-review

This self-review guide is part of the Inclusive Practices Toolkit. Is has been designed to support schools to engage in a review process.

Index for Inclusion: Indicators

This is a set of materials to support the self-review of all aspects of a school setting.

Prof. Tony Booth: Index of Inclusion

Prof. Tony Booth discusses the index for inclusion in this short video.

Principles and levels of self-review

The Educational Leaders website provides an explanation of the forms and levels of effective self-review

Mangere Central School: teachers talk

This pecha kucha, by teachers at Mangere Central School, describes their challenge to sustain a focus on accelerating student achievement. Leaders talk about how supporting teachers to inquire into their own practices has helped students make accelerated gains.

Principals talk about inclusive practices (NZ) (video)
Learning better together

School leaders talk about how they have supported the development of inclusive practices in their school.

No captions or transcript available

Source: IHC (NZ)

Principals talk about inclusive practices (NZ)
Inclusive practices and the curriculum

The Inclusion principle in the NZ Curriculum states that the curriculum is non-sexist, non-racist, and non-discriminatory; it ensures that students’ identities, languages, abilities, and talents are recognised and affirmed and that their learning needs are addressed.

To enable this, the curriculum is non-prescriptive. Its flexibility allows schools to develop their curriculum as they notice, recognise, and respond to the needs of all their learners and their community.

It mandates that schools move away from a one-size-fits-all paradigm towards the inclusive design of teaching and learning, where ALL students can expect to:

  • connect their culture, experiences and interests to their learning
  • learn in flexible environments with adjustable materials they can personalise to meet their learning needs and preferences
  • engage in ongoing, timely conversations about their learning with teachers and peers
  • access learning opportunities, experiences and environments alongside their peers
  • be supported to advocate for their own needs and lead their own learning
  • share their thinking and learning in ways that demonstrate their understanding.

 

 

Inclusive practices and the curriculum
Universal Design for Learning (UDL) (image)
3 principles of UDL based on the work of CAST Center of Applied Special Technologies
Introduce UDL

Explore UDL as an approach to underpin inclusive practices in all aspects of schooling. Apply to classroom practice, PLD design, school rebuilds, event design, home, school and community partnerships. 

For more information visit Universal Design for Learning guide.

Source: Adapted from CAST UDL

Universal Design for Learning (UDL)
Develop shared understandings (image)
The most appropriate label is usually the one someone’s parents have given them
Initiating and facilitating discussions about inclusion

Take a "people first" approach.

As words can shape our ideas, perceptions, and attitudes about others, take time to discuss the values and beliefs that underpin practice.

Source: Michael Giangreco

Develop shared understandings
Support access to PLD for part-time staff (image)
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Equitable access to professional learning

Invest time and capacity in supporting the learning of all staff in inclusive practices.

Particularly invest in those staff who are part-time, or in teacher's aide, support staff, or visiting roles to strengthen their understanding of the school's inclusive vision.

 

Source: Michael Giangreco

Support access to PLD for part-time staff

Resources and downloads

Teachers and teachers’ aides working together

Nine modules that teachers and teachers’ aides complete together to strengthen working relationships, improve role clarity and build knowledge of inclusive practice. Developed by the Ministry of Education.

Education that fits: Review of international trends in the education of students with special educational needs

Overview of UDL by Dr David Mitchell, University of Canterbury. The theme of this chapter is that educational services and policies should be universally designed. Regular education should be accessible to all students in terms of pedagogy, curriculum and resourcing, through the design of differentiated learning experiences that minimise the need for subsequent modifications for particular circumstances or individuals.

Shaping a Marautanga-ā-Kura with our community

In this report from the Educational leaders website, Principal, Helena Baker, from Te Kura o Tākaro, describes how she worked with her community to design her school’s curriculum.

Index for Inclusion: Developing learning and participation in schools

A set of materials developed by the Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education to guide UK schools through a process of inclusive school development.

Defining what is evidence (image)
A graphic of RTLB evidence-based practice framework for evaluating data.
Integrating knowledge from multiple sources

Source and evaluate, with others knowledge and stories from multiple sources, the learner’s context, and valid research to inform practice.

Source: Resource teacher learning and behaviour online

Defining what is evidence
Model an inquiry disposition (image)
Teachers learn together
Learning alongside colleagues

School leaders learn about the effective use of data alongside colleagues.

 

Source: Enabling-e-Learning

Model an inquiry disposition
Setting school-wide goals

Using assessment data to determine overall trends and to set school-wide goals

This set of resources on Assessment Online aims to cover the understandings and skills educators need in order to:

  1. gather dependable information about the status of a student’s (or group of students’) learning

  2. accurately aggregate and present information in order for it to be easily understood

  3. interpret and evaluate information for individuals and groups of students in order to decide on what to do next to support learning

  4. present and share information to build partnerships for learning (with parents, whānau, colleagues, boards)

  5. set challenging but achievable targets for improved student achievement.

Setting school-wide goals
Introducing a collaborative learning culture

When planning for introducing collaborative learning cultures, school leadership teams need to:

  • emphasise to teachers that they can succeed – together
  • expect teachers to keep their knowledge and skills up-to-date
  • share decision-making and prepare others to lead
  • make data accessible
  • teach and model discussion and decision-making skills
  • provide teachers with the research
  • take time to build trust.
Introducing a collaborative learning culture

Resources and downloads

Learning conversations that strengthen teaching practice

This is an Educational Leaders website report of how learning conversations are used as a key strategy to strengthen teaching practice and improve learning outcomes at Vardon School.

Looking behind the data at Queen Charlotte College

In this article from the Educational Leaders website, Principal, Tom Parsons, explains how student achievement improved when teachers took a more systematic approach to understanding what school data was telling them.

UDL implementation: A process of change

This video examines UDL implementation as a process of systemic change. It discusses what makes UDL implementation different from the implementation of other frameworks or initiatives and the areas of focus during the five phases of UDL implementation.

Scheduling regular meetings (video)
Inclusive learning: Everyone’s in

Principals of Edmonton schools talk about the importance of committing time and resources to collaborative planning and teaching to support inclusive practices.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Edmonton Schools (Canada)

Scheduling regular meetings
Retreats for reflection (video)
Aim to energise and inspire

Mission Hill School in Boston is recognised internationally for its inclusive practices. The staff go on retreats to review and plan learning. View the first 2 minutes.

No captions or transcript available

Source: A year at Mission Hill (US)

Retreats for reflection
Taking a reciprocal approach

Ako is about building collaborative learning and teaching relationships within the school. It suggests a reciprocal approach to leading learning.

"Ako describes a teaching and learning relationship where the educator is also learning from the student in a two-way process and where educators’ practices are informed by the latest research and are both deliberate and reflective." (Ka Hikitia: Accelerating success 2013-2017, p16)

By being open to learning, principals and middle and senior leaders increase the collective knowledge available to the school.

Taking a reciprocal approach
Support a collaborative culture

Support a culture where all staff value and feel collective responsibility for all students and are engaged in learning together how to meet the variable needs of students most effectively.

Explicitly and continually encourage staff to connect, learn, and problem solve with:

  • colleagues
  • in-school learning support leaders and teachers with knowledge and experience in inclusive practices
  • outside agencies 
  • parents and experienced community members
  • local teachers in nearby schools
  • other teachers via online communities of practice and social media.
Support a collaborative culture
Principal as system player (video)
Role of the principal

Michael Fullan talks about using the group to change the group!

He believes today's principals don’t work in isolation – they collaborate and learn within their school and among other schools.

 

No captions or transcript available

Source: Michael Fullan (Canada)

Principal as system player

Resources and downloads

Promoting collaborative learning cultures

In this article from the Educational Leaders website Michael Fullan’s idea of “purposeful peer interaction,” is explained. This is where information and knowledge are shared openly, and when monitoring mechanisms are installed to detect ineffective actions and identify effective practices.

Gary Punler: Deprivatising practice

In this article from the Educational Leaders website, Principal, Gary Punler describes why is it important for schools to have a process in place to facilitate teachers meeting and sharing ideas.

Working together

Collaborative decision making template, developed by IEP Online Ministry of Education.

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Building a world-leading education system that equips all New Zealanders with the knowledge, skills, and values to be successful citizens in the 21st century.