Date
27 September 2022

Build relationships with whānau and others who know the student well

Suggestion for implementing the strategy ‘Taking a community approach to supporting learning and wellbeing’

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Involve families

Involve families

Linda Ojala describes how families contribute to the class programme.

Ideas for working with whānau

Ideas for working with whānau

Suggestions for working closely with parents, caregivers, and whānau.

  • Communicate and share information in ways that work for everyone, for example, social media, playground conversations, email, Skype, a notebook, class blog, newsletters with photos.
  • Value parents’ and caregivers’ knowledge about their child and assessments they have had done out of school.
  • Involve whānau in determining strategies to support student learning and well-being at home and school.
  • Work with programmes or materials parents are using to maximise consistency and support for the student.
  • Share information about out-of-school programmes that may boost self-esteem (for example, groups for music, art, or sporting interests).
  • Recognise areas of expertise and experience and look for opportunities to explicitly value and utilise them in the classroom.

Engage with whānau and iwi

Engage with whānau and iwi

Strong engagement and contribution from students and those who are best placed to support them – parents and whānau, hapū, iwi, Māori organisations, communities and businesses – have a strong influence on students’ success. Māori students’ learning is strengthened when education professionals include a role for parents and whānau, hapū, iwi, and Māori organisations and communities in curriculum, teaching and learning.

Listen to families

Listen to families

Parents, Dayna and Phil, found sharing successful approaches and incorporating their daughter’s interests reduced anxiety and provided consistency between home and school.

Work closely with families

Work closely with families

John Robinson describes the impact of working closely with parents and whānau.

Useful resources

Useful resources

Website

Perspectives of whānau

Parents of students needing additional support outline their needs and how schools can best work with them to meet those needs. Key information is from the ERO report Partners in learning: Parents’ voices. An example of practice from a primary school and discussion questions are provided on this page from the Inclusive Practices website (NZ).

Publisher: The New Zealand Curriculum Online

Visit website

Website

Engaging Pasifika parents and communities

Resources and videos which focus on engagement with parents, families, and communities.

Publisher: Pasifika Education Community

Visit website

Website

Ka Hikitia – Ka Hāpaitia

Ka Hikitia, the Māori Education Strategy, is a cross-agency strategy for the education sector.

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

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Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Take a community approach ”:

Return to the guide “Developing an inclusive classroom culture ”

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