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Date
17 July 2024

Create support plans

Work as a team to provide care and support when needed.

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Plan before anything happens

Plan before anything happens

Work in collaboration to develop a clear and tailored support plan for ākonga learning and wellbeing at school.

It’s all about planning. So, having a very clear plan before anything happens, you know,‘When you feel this way, try this’. Maybe go and find a squeezy ball or something like that. ‘I can see you’re getting agitated; let’s find your squeezy ball.’ Have a very clear plan about what you do to de-escalate, because the kids don’t want to be like that.

Work together

Work together

He Pikorua, the Learning Support Practice Framework, outlines the key ways to work together to plan for goal-oriented action.

The team agrees to the approach to take.

  • Clarify a plan’s purpose with the team and include actions that will meet achievable short- and long-term goals, based on agreed outcomes.
  • Agree roles and responsibilities with all team members as part of planning.
  • Discuss options for any interventions with the team, and take into consideration the environment, resources and capacity of those implementing the intervention.
  • Design the plan to be flexible and responsive to any changing needs and circumstances that might affect the mokopuna and whānau.
  • Focus long-term goals on developing the skills of people or the contextual supports around the mokopuna.
  • Consider strengthening capability in the setting to ensure the plan continues to be followed once the team is no longer involved.

Source: He Pikorua, Tātai – Plan collaboratively (opens in a new tab/window)

Practise person centred responses

Practise person centred responses

Provide options that cater for the unique needs of the learner.

Wherever we work, we all want the same thing: for the individuals in our care to feel safe and respected, and live happy and fulfilling lives. So, when it comes to responding to behaviours that cause concern or risk, we’re focused on offering personalised help and support, rather than making generalised demands of compliance and correction.

Use a strengths based planning approach

Use a strengths based planning approach

Components of a support plan may include:

  • shared protocols, privacy and the best ways to communicate together
  • ākonga strengths, interests and preferences
  • ākonga and whānau aspirations
  • people who can provide support, both in and outside of school, including who to contact when challenges occur
  • strategies and routines to help ākonga to thrive 
  • environments and options to support ākonga success
  • things that cause distress and known signs of distress
  • strategies that can be used to support ākonga when distressed, such as ways to approach and talk to ākonga, quiet spaces, time out or movement breaks and visuals or thinking routines
  • “safe” or preferred activities to de-escalate difficult situations
  • when the plan will be reviewed and what might trigger a review.

Design specific supports

Design specific supports

Parents and whānau know their tamariki and can pre-empt situations that could cause distress. This video shows examples of how teaching teams can respond and plan specific support for tamariki.

Next steps

Return to the guide “Behaviour and learning”

Guide to Index of the guide: Behaviour and learning

Strategies for action:

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