Welcome to Inclusive Education.


Supporting Māori students

http://inclusive.tki.org.nz/guides/supporting-maori-students/

Building a partnership based on understanding and respect between teachers, parents, whānau, hapū, and iwi will support all Māori students to achieve success as Māori.

This guide focuses on inclusive teaching and learning strategies that can be used in the classroom to create a more effective learning environment for all Māori students. Strengthening the self-identity and self-esteem of students who may need additional support to learn is a central theme.

Exploring Māori cultural perspectives on inclusion, learning support and disability

Develop an understanding of the different perspectives and values held by Māori parents and whānau. This will help you create learning environments and design supports for learning that more effectively meet the needs of Māori learners in your community.

Mā te kōrero, ka mōhio.

Mā te mōhio, ka mārama.

Mā te mārama, ka mātau.

 

Through discussion we become aware.

Through awareness we gain understanding.

Through understanding we gain proficiency/expertise.

Whakataukī

Suggestions and resources

A parent's story (NZ) (video)
What has worked for my family

Sharon Beattie, a parent of a child with low vision, shares her knowledge and experiences of what has worked for her family.

No captions or transcript available

Source: BLENNZ (NZ)

A parent's story (NZ)
Is my child welcome?

Parents of children with special education needs found that some schools were not open to working with them, and they felt that they were unwelcome. They struggled with entrenched attitudes by some school staff about their child and his or her learning or behavioural needs. For some parents, labelling their child and themselves, sometimes linked to previous family history with the school, undermined the development of constructive relationships.

Source: Partners in learning: Parents' voices (September 2008)
Is my child welcome?
Whānau perspectives on disability

There is no one approach to partnering with parents and whānau

Parents and whānau will have differing perspectives on inclusion, disability and accessing learning support for their children.

Find out about their:

  • values and beliefs about disability and inclusion (including knowledge of their whakapapa [genealogy]) 
  • personal experiences of learning
  • hopes and dreams for their child
  • fears and anxieties
  • expectations around support for learning.

Where parent and whānau values and expectations differ from those of your school, be open to learning from parents. 

Whānau perspectives on disability
Whānau expectations of schools

Māori parents expected schools to:

  • give them honest, accurate, and useful information about their child’s progress and achievement
  • support their children to become confident learners who accepted challenges and maintained their personal mana
  • invite them to be part of their child’s learning
  • acknowledge their culture and values through the use of Māori protocols, for example, mihi and karakia at meetings
  • provide programmes in te reo Māori and tikanga that supported their children’s learning.

Source: Adapted from Partners in learning: Parents' voices (September 2008)

Whānau expectations of schools
Understanding rangatahi who are Deaf (NZ) (video)
Ko Wai Au – Who am I? See my voice

Māori rangatahi who identify as Deaf help schools and communities to have a better understanding of their access and communication needs, and their aspirations.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education (NZ)

Understanding rangatahi who are Deaf (NZ)

Resources and downloads

Special education needs

This site provides practical information about education for families and whānau of children with special education needs. It describes the New Zealand education system and Ministry of Education services.

Family/whānau file

A booklet published by the Ministry of Education to help parents of students with additional needs to brief their child’s school.

Exhibition celebrates the stories of young deaf Māori

A visual and narrative exhibition by six Deaf rangatahi, aimed at promoting a understanding of the educational experiences of Māori Deaf and hard-of-hearing youth.

The family book: Te pukapuka o nga whānau

An introduction to services and supports for families and whānau of children who are hard of hearing.

The risk of negative self-concepts

 

“You may be wondering why positive student-teacher relationships are more crucial to learning for these groups of students than to students in general … chief amongst them is the connection between learning and ... self-esteem, self-efficacy, self-identity, self-concept and self-assessment. Students from ethnic minorities and those with special education needs have an increased risk of developing negative self-concepts ...This in turn affects their ability to learn.”

Source: Dr Jill Bevan-Brown, Teaching Māori students with special education needs, Kairaranga, Volume 7, 2006
The risk of negative self-concepts
The system must fit the learner

To ensure that all Māori can achieve their full potential in education, the system must fit the learner rather than the learner fit the system.

In dealing with issues of Māori learner underperformance and unrealised potential, there is a tendency to locate the issue of underperformance in the students themselves.

Personalising the school’s approach to learning so it is relevant and meaningful, no matter what the level or ability of the learner, will ensure that schools effectively meet the needs of each individual in a way that works for them.

Source: Schools' Provision for Students at Risk of Not Achieving (August 2008)

The system must fit the learner
Impact of teacher beliefs

At its simplest, the research showed that 80% of the students identified their relationship with their teacher as the critical influence.

By contrast 60% of teachers identified the students’ home and family background as the major influence.

Confronted with this evidence and supported with professional development the teachers recognised that to make a difference they would need to change their beliefs and practices rather than expect family circumstances to adjust. When they did the results were marked in terms of improved engagement and increased academic achievement.

Teachers found that when they valued the diversity of students and used it as a strength in the classroom their pedagogy became much more inclusive.

Ministry of Education ; Source: Ka Hikitia Demonstration Report: Effectiveness of Te Kotahitanga Phase 5 2010–12
Impact of teacher beliefs
Effective approaches
  1. Teachers’ knowledge and understanding of how to establish effective teaching and learning relationships with Māori students is of prime importance, especially for those at risk of not achieving.

  2. Where teaching is inclusive and reflects the student’s life, knowledge, relationships, and experience, students are more likely to engage with learning.

  3. School leaders play an important part in establishing and sustaining whānau involvement and support.

  4. School leaders are pivotal in ensuring that professional learning has a strong basis in student performance data, and that this information informs the teaching strategies best suited to meet students’ needs.

  5. Whānau have an important role in working with school leaders to ensure the pedagogy is culturally relevant and responsive to their children, and that it is focused on improving outcomes for Māori learners.

Source: ERO. Schools' provision for students at risk of not achieving (August 2008)

Effective approaches
Cultural competencies of teachers

High-quality teaching is the most important influence the education system can have on high-quality outcomes for students with diverse learning needs (Ka Hikitia).

Effective teaching and learning depends on the relationship between teachers and students and students’ active engagement.

The cultural competencies outlined below describe the behaviours teachers will need and what the results could look like for learners and their whānau.

  • Wānanga: participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.
  • Whanaungatanga: actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents, whānau, hapū, and iwi.
  • Manaakitanga: showing integrity, sincerity, and respect towards Māori beliefs, language, and culture.
  • Tangata whenuatanga: affirming Māori learners as Māori; providing contexts for learning where the language, identity, and culture of Māori learners and their whānau is affirmed.
  • Ako: taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.

Source: Tātaiako: Cultural competencies for teachers of Māori Learners (p 2)

Cultural competencies of teachers

Resources and downloads

Working with Māori students with special education needs, He mahi whakahirahira

Explores the key components of culturally responsive, evidence-based, special education practice and describes holistic and inclusive responses to educating all tamariki, especially those with identified special education need.

Special education and district office contacts

This is a contact list for Ministry of Education teams that provide support and advice, and identify professional development opportunities.

Measurable Gains Framework

The Measurable Gains Framework was developed by the Ministry of Education to measure and report on progress in implementing Ka Hikitia. It consists of several rubrics that provide a shared understanding of what effective practice for Māori learners is, and allow the interpretation of findings from multiple sources to report progress. The tool is easily adapted for use in schools.

Identity, cultural well-being, and growing up kāpo Māori

This article explores how education services impact on the identity and cultural well-being of kāpo (blind) Māori.

Tātaiako: Cultural competencies for teachers of Māori learners

Tātaiako is a resource explaining competencies teachers need to develop so they can help Māori learners achieve educationally as Māori. It was developed by the Ministry of Education, the Teachers Council and a reference group of academics, teacher education practitioners, and iwi representatives involved in iwi educational initiatives.

Te Tere Auraki – Māori in English-medium strategy

Te Tere Auraki is a professional development strategy focusing on improving outcomes for Māori students in English-medium schools. This strategy supports four main programmes: Te Kotahitanga, Te Kauhua, the Māori Secondary Teacher Workload, and Te Mana Kōrero.

National mentoring service for Māori and Pasifika students

Details of the National Mentoring Service (a community-based initiative) supported by the Ministry of Education. It's aimed at supporting young Māori and Pasifika students, in a culturally responsive way, to successfully achieve NCEA.

KA HIKITIA A Demonstration Report Effectiveness of Te Kotahitanga Phase 5 2010-2012

A report on Te Kotahitanga with a focus on Phase 5, which was informed by the earlier phases and by new knowledge about leadership, school–whānau connections, implementation, scaling up, autonomy, accountability, momentum, and sustainability.

Schools' provision for students at risk of not achieving - ERO report August 2008

A report produced by ERO which outlines specific initiatives to support students, and school-wide approaches to support student achievement.

Tau Mai Te Reo – The Māori Language in Education Strategy 2013-2017

Tau Mai Te Reo expresses what the Ministry of Education and education sector agencies will do for learners of Māori language in English medium and Māori medium. The Māori and English language versions of Tau Mai Te Reo, and their summaries, are available to download.

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Knowing your Māori learners and their contexts

Demonstrate care by continually investing in getting to know your learners and what's important to them. Make connections to their experiences and contexts to support learning and strengthen relationships.

The most profound way to create a culturally responsive context is through introducing co-construction, where the student is free to bring their own experiences into that classroom context.

Source: Te Mangōroa (NZ) 

Suggestions and resources

Connecting culture, learning and supports

The most effective classroom practice occurs where teachers:

  1. ensure that their teaching is responsive to both the socio-cultural, emotional and cognitive dimensions of a student

  2. understand the importance of creating a learning environment where a student’s background and learning needs are interdependent

  3. seek ways to adjust their teaching to take account of the particular social, emotional and academic needs of the learner.

Source: Schools' Provision for Students at Risk of Not Achieving (August 2008)

Connecting culture, learning and supports
Building trust (NZ) (video)
Establish a rapport

Teachers talk about the importance of getting to know your students and building trust to enable learning.

View transcript

Source: Te Mangōroa (NZ)

Building trust (NZ)
Finding out where students are from (NZ) (video)
Whakapapa – Where are you from?

Create ongoing opportunities for students to share where they are from, what is important to them and why.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Matapuna Training Centre (NZ)

Finding out where students are from (NZ)
Supporting Māori achievement (image)
Effective Teaching Profile
Effective Teaching Profile

Russell Bishop’s Effective Teaching Profile guides pedagogy to improve the educational achievement of Māori students in mainstream secondary school classrooms. Consider these six elements as you create a culturally responsive context.

Source: Te Kotahitanga eBook Collection

Supporting Māori achievement
Creating authentic relevant contexts (NZ) (video)
Connecting learning to culture

Respond to what you learn about students.

Create opportunities where they can directly connect their language, culture and identity to learning.

View transcript

Source: Te Mangōroa (NZ)

Creating authentic relevant contexts (NZ)

Resources and downloads

Te Kotahitanga eBook Collection

A collection of 10 eBooks based on research and learning between Professor Emeritus Russell Bishop and Associate Professor Mere Berryman. These eBooks cover connecting with Māori communities, strategies supporting reading and writing, the effective teacher profile, and launching Te Kotahitanga with staff and school communities.

Tātaiako: Cultural competencies for teachers of Māori learners

Tātaiako is a resource explaining competencies teachers need to develop so they can help Māori learners achieve educationally as Māori. It was developed by the Ministry of Education, the Teachers Council and a reference group of academics, teacher education practitioners, and iwi representatives involved in iwi educational initiatives.

TBH – Māori boys’ writing may not be your target!

In this blog post, Janelle Riki-Waaka discusses ways of supporting Māori learners to achieve in literacy.

The effective teaching profile

The effective teaching profile is made up of two parts. The first identifies two major understandings that effective teachers of Māori students possess, and the second identifies six ways effective teachers relate and interact with Mäori students on a daily basis. This resource includes video clips to illustrate key Māori understandings.

Te Kotahitanga observation tool

The Observation Tool is linked directly to the effective teaching profile. It provides a framework for classroom observations of teacher–student interactions and teacher relationships with Māori students, as well as a means of identifying the strategies that teachers use.

Understanding rangatahi who are Deaf (NZ) (video)
Ko Wai Au – Who am I? See my voice

Māori rangatahi who identify as Deaf help schools and communities to have a better understanding of their access and communication needs, and their aspirations.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education (NZ)

Understanding rangatahi who are Deaf (NZ)
Sharing mihi (NZ) (video)
Who am I?

Offer students the tools and supports they need to develop and share their mihi, supported by their whānau.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Enabling e-learning (NZ)

Sharing mihi (NZ)
Valuing mihi (NZ) (video)
Placing value on your students’ mihi

A student from Melville Intermediate School presents her mihi for a class blog.

No captions or transcript available

Source: waikatoforever (NZ)

Valuing mihi (NZ)
Sample mihi

An example of a simple mihimihi

Ko (name of your waka) te waka
My canoe is (name of your waka)
Ko (name of your mountain) te maunga
My mountain is (name of your mountain)
Ko (name of your river) te awa
My river is (name of your river)
Ko (name of your tribe) te iwi
My tribe is (name of your tribe)
Ko (name of your sub tribe) te hapū
My sub tribe is (name of your sub tribe)
Ko (name of your chief) te rangatira
(Name of your chief) is the chief
Ko (name of your marae) te marae
My marae is (name of your marae)
Ko (your name) ahau
I am (your name)

Source: Kōrero Māori website – Mihimihi

Sample mihi
Fostering belonging (NZ) (video)
Pepeha and the school mihi

In the Russell Street School mihi students share their pepeha, and show how they belong to their community and their school.

No captions or transcript available

Source: rssrosie (NZ)

Fostering belonging (NZ)
A senior student’s profile (image)
Learner profile
Example of a senior student profile

A student’s profile can be created in any format that works for the student, including:

  • a document with photos
  • a slide presentation with photos
  • a video 
  • a blog.

Source: Ministry of Education

A senior student’s profile
Surveying students

In the video Student Profiles, Canadian secondary teacher, Naryn Searcy describes how she asks students about how they learn most effectively. She also asks students what is important to them beyond school.

She uses this information in her planning:

"I personally do a survey at the beginning of every class, every semester – just everything from personal background, to their history in the subject area, to things they like to do outside of school, usually put a whole bunch of activities down there that we would potentially do in the class and ask them to rank it – you know, what would you enjoy doing, what would you not like doing.

So just to get an idea of who is in the classroom to begin with and what they would benefit, or what they want to see in the class, what would work for them."

Source: UDL supporting diversity in BC schools (Canada)

Surveying students
Benefits of learner profiles

It’s useful to develop profiles of your students and use these as the basis of a class profile.

A learner profile tells teachers about students. It sits alongside assessment data. It helps school staff to build relationships with students and to understand things from a student perspective. It can inform planning, classroom layout, timetabling, and supports to enable students to participate and contribute in all classroom learning.

Developing a learner profile means your students can:

  • express who they are 
  • address assumptions 
  • express their aspirations and passions
  • have a say in what goes on for them.

Senior students may prefer to just have a conversation. Take time to get students’ views of what will support their learning.

Benefits of learner profiles
What to include in a learner profile

The purpose of a learner profile can be agreed by the student, their whānau, and the teacher.

Depending on the purpose, a useful profile can include:

  1. the student’s whakapapa (genealogy)

  2. cultural practices (language, customs, traditions)

  3. important people

  4. cultural connections and experiences

  5. languages spoken

  6. memorable life experiences

  7. things the student is good at

  8. likes and interests

  9. dislikes and things they avoid

  10. how they like to learn and what helps

  11. things that make it hard for them

  12. what they do when they need help

  13. how they like to unwind and relax.

What to include in a learner profile

Resources and downloads

Developing learner profiles

This document provides general support and guidance when developing a learner profile. It includes prompts and questions, along side purpose and benefits for students.

Rachel's learner profile (NZ high school)

An example of a secondary student’s learner profile.

Laiza’s transition

An example of a primary school student’s learner profile, developed by the adults around her.

Student profiles

A resource from UDL British Columbia Schools providing information to support developing student profiles. It contains a video with teachers sharing strategies they use to get to know their students each year.

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Establishing reciprocal relationships with parents and whānau to support learning

Develop positive relationships with the community of people who know the student well.

Learning partnerships strengthen everyone’s involvement in the student’s education and underpin a shared responsibility for learning and wellbeing.

Source: ERO. (September 2008). Partners in Learning: Parent voices

Manaakitanga, or caring for your students’ wellbeing and learning, provides a common purpose and bond with parents and whānau (parent perspective).

Source: Chrissie Butler (NZ)

 

Closed captioning available in player

Suggestions and resources

Finding common ground (NZ) (video)
Learning about Māori protocol when making first connections with an RTLB referral

Mereana talks about the importance of making connections and finding common ground.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Learningthistime (NZ)

Finding common ground (NZ)
What to ask whānau

Connect with whānau to understand the strengths and needs of their child

Find out about:

  • tribal structures and cultural practices:
    • whakapapa (genealogy)
    • who they consider to be whānau
    • tikanga - cultural values and practices they use (language, customs, traditions)
    • about their marae.
  • people in the student’s life:
    • parent and whānau hopes and priorities for them
    • the important people in the student’s life
    • the best methods and times to communicate with whānau
    • the professionals working with the whānau 
    • the questions they have and the support they would like from the school.
  • practical elements:
    • the language/s spoken at home
    • students’ medications and allergies
    • the equipment used at home
    • what they do at home to support learning.
  • student’s likes and dislikes:
    • their likes, interests, what they’re good at, need help with, and can do independently
    • their dislikes, what can upset them, how they express this, and their calming skills
    • their favourite hobbies, books, songs, sports, TV programmes.
What to ask whānau
Suggestions for working with whānau

Suggestions for working together with parents, caregivers, and whānau

  1. Develop a shared understanding of tikanga (cultural practices), such as language, customs, obligations, traditions.

  2. Promote regular kanohi ki te kanohi, face-to-face contact to reinforce strong communication and engagement with parents and whānau right from the start.

  3. Communicate and share information in a meaningful way, demonstrating understanding and support for whānau concerns.

  4. Value what parents, caregivers, and whānau have noticed or assessments they have had done outside school.

  5. Involve parents and whānau in determining strategies to support student learning and well-being.

  6. Ask about and work with any programmes or materials being used at home to maximise consistency and support for the student.

  7. Develop systems for passing on information about a student’s needs, progress, and next steps, in ways that are meaningful.

  8. Regularly communicate positive information and achievements to the whānau.

Suggestions for working with whānau
Utilising parents’ skills and expertise

Engagement also worked well when schools tapped into parents’ skills, talents and expertise. It was important that teachers trusted them as parents for the knowledge they had about their child. Having teachers who believed in their child’s potential was critical to successful and sustainable learning partnerships.

Source: Partners in Learning: Parent’s voices (2008)
Utilising parents’ skills and expertise
Parent perspectives of partnership

We are true partners when:

  • you listen to what I have to say
  • you acknowledge my intelligence
  • you want to learn more about my ways
  • you don’t judge me
  • you engage me in genuine dialogue
  • we make decisions together
  • you show that my child matters to you
  • you include my experience, knowledge, and viewpoints with yours.

Source: Partners in learning: Parents’ voices 2008 (page 123)

Parent perspectives of partnership

Resources and downloads

Connecting with Māori communities Whānau, Hāpu and Iwi

This resource gives school leaders, teachers, and staff a process for thinking about why they should connect with and develop collaborative home–school relationships with their Māori communities.

A community approach to e-learning with kura

Liz Stevenson talks about the approach Kutarere School takes when engaging and working their local community.

Family/whānau file

A booklet published by the Ministry of Education to help parents of students with additional needs to brief their child’s school.

Sharing student learning

This collection of school stories shows how technology can facilitate communication between school and the home.

Ruia: School-whānau partnerships for Māori learners’ success

This resource supports principals and school leaders to improve outcomes for Māori students by working in educationally powerful partnerships with whānau.

Strengthening families: Whakapiripiri nga whānau

This resource provides information about a government initiative that supports family/whānau with children or young adults who need help from more than one support service or government agency.

Education for Māori: Relationships between schools and whānau

This second report from the Office of the Auditor-General, February 2015, provides an analysis of a survey of whānau, and primary and secondary schools, to find out what they thought about their relationships.

Contributions from whānau

Information and examples for classroom teachers to support building positive relationships with parents and whānau that support student learning, from the Inclusive Practices website (NZ).

Demonstrating manaakitanga (care)

Manaakitanga, or caring for your students’ wellbeing and learning, provides a common purpose and bond with parents and whānau.

Care can be demonstrated through making the time and effort to build positive relationships with your students, their whānau, and communities of support. Find out parents’ aspirations for their child. It is a mark of respect and an indication that you value everyone’s contribution. This in turn helps you to provide the best teaching that you can.

Demonstrating manaakitanga (care)
Finding common ground (NZ) (video)
Learning about Māori protocol when making first connections with an RTLB referral.

Mereana talks about the importance of making connections and finding common ground.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Learningthistime (NZ)

Finding common ground (NZ)
A culture of listening

Create a culture where parents and whānau are listened to by:

  • being open and welcoming to parents and their children, and initiating and making connections with whānau
  • asking parents and whānau about their preferred means of communication, such as face-to-face, email or text
  • creating opportunities and time for parents and whānau to talk about their children’s learning and wellbeing
  • identifying appropriate staff, such as the SENCO and HOD Learning Support, as key contact people for specific parents
  • listening to, and addressing, parents’ concerns.

Source: Adapted from Partners in Learning: Parent’s voices (September 2008)

A culture of listening

Resources and downloads

Special education needs

This site provides practical information about education for families and whānau of children with special education needs. It describes the New Zealand education system and Ministry of Education services.

School-whānau partnerships – Randwick School

The school’s principal, a teacher, and a parent BOT member discuss manaakitanga, the philosophy that underpins the school’s practice.

Interview with Dr. Mere Berryman, Senior Research Fellow at Waikato University

Dr Berryman talks about creating a welcoming space where whānau and school can talk and work together for the benefit of Māori children.

Ruia: School-whānau partnerships for Māori learners’ success

This resource supports principals and school leaders to improve outcomes for Māori students by working in educationally powerful partnerships with whānau.

Home-school contact

Establish regular, two-way contact between home and school, focused on sharing students’ successes

Parents suggested schools could:

  • improve the timeliness and regularity of feedback and information, especially in relation to children’s presence, participation, learning, and achievement
  • provide regular opportunities for participation and involvement
  • provide information about how to become involved in the school
  • ensure that whānau feel they are heard, fully involved, and not rushed in meetings, interviews, and conferences
  • report on students’ progress in language and formats that are meaningful to, and can be easily understood by, the student and family/whānau
  • be open and listen to parents’ views
  • find ways for parents and whānau to lead activities and events, especially for other parents and their children.

Source: Partners in learning: Schools’ engagement with parents, whānau, and communities in New Zealand (May 2008)

Home-school contact
Using digital portfolios (NZ) (video)
Celebrating success at Hiruharama School

Digital portfolios created and maintained by students are a vehicle for communicating learning to whānau.

View transcript

Source: Te Mangōroa (NZ)

Using digital portfolios (NZ)
Using technologies to communicate

Examples of utilising technologies to support communication:

  1. Leave computers on at the end of the day and invite parents and whānau to view students’ digital work.

  2. Find out the types of technology that parents and whānau use and offer to share in those mediums.

  3. Consider using multiple channels, such as mobile devices, email, instant messaging services, social media, and the school website, to connect with parents and whānau.

  4. Provide deliberate support or training to show parents and whānau how they can engage with students’ work, both face-to-face and through technology.

  5. Create and promote online spaces such as blogs that invite parent and whānau participation and feedback.

  6. Establish a site or portal for parents and whānau to access and contribute to student learning.

  7. Design e-portfolios to inform future steps in learning.

Using technologies to communicate
Engaging outside agencies

Before engaging support for students from outside services and agencies:

  • find out from whānau whether they are already connected with outside agencies or programmes or have been in the past, and what their experience of these agencies/programmes was
  • check with colleagues, especially the learning support team, to find out which services and agencies the school already has a relationship with and get some feedback on the effectiveness of the partnerships
  • research possible options for support, so that you can make an informed contribution to discussions
  • outline other possible options for support when you are discussing the specific needs of a student with their whānau.
Engaging outside agencies

Resources and downloads

Engaging with the community

This section of the Enabling e-Learning website provides examples of ways schools can engage with their communities through information and communication technologies.

Te mana kōrero: The way forward

Keriana Tawhiwhirangi, Director of the Principals’ Development Association, gives advice on improving engagement with whānau.

National mentoring service for Māori and Pasifika students

Details of the National Mentoring Service (a community-based initiative) supported by the Ministry of Education. It's aimed at supporting young Māori and Pasifika students, in a culturally responsive way, to successfully achieve NCEA.

Explaining ways to help (NZ) (video)
The Mutukaroa project

Coordinators meet with parents at home, at their work, or at school to explain assessments and discuss how they can support their child’s learning.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Enabling e-Learning (NZ)

Explaining ways to help (NZ)
Supporting learning at home

Strategies to support whānau to support their children’s learning at home

  • Meet face-to-face to model particular strategies or make a video to model a particular strategy or approach.
  • Create opportunities where students can draw on the expertise and experience of their whānau and work together on a project.
  • Maintain a class blog or a weekly email to whānau, where you share the class focus and encourage them to share resources and ideas.
  • Avoid setting up situations where you are encouraging whānau to supervise homework.
Supporting learning at home
Using e-portfolios (NZ) (video)
Parents engaging in student learning

e-Portfolios and three-way, student-led conferences help parents to develop a deeper understanding of how their child is progressing and how they can support their learning.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Enabling e-Learning (NZ)

Using e-portfolios (NZ)

Resources and downloads

Connections and collaboration: Two strategies to accelerate reading

This eBook details Pause Prompt Praise and Reciprocal Teaching. These effective reading strategies are consistent with the principles of culturally responsive and relational pedagogies. Research documents that with use at school and home, exceptional results are achieved.

National mentoring service for Māori and Pasifika students

Details of the National Mentoring Service (a community-based initiative) supported by the Ministry of Education. It's aimed at supporting young Māori and Pasifika students, in a culturally responsive way, to successfully achieve NCEA.

Engaging with the community

This section of the Enabling e-Learning website provides examples of ways schools can engage with their communities through information and communication technologies.

Community engagement

This article explains the effectiveness of links between home and school, including links to tools and resources.

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Building strong community networks

Inclusive values are developed through students’ experiences and their exposure to other cultures and world views. Welcome your community into the classroom and take your class out to the community.

It’s not enough to invite the community to come to you – you have to go into the community.

Source: Te Mangōroa (NZ)

Suggestions and resources

Community mentors (NZ) (video)
Making connections in your community

The Sole Project is a week-long, arts-mentoring workshop for eight rangatahi and eight mentors, organised by Ngā Rangatahi Toa.

No captions or transcript available

Source: The Sole Project - Chur Ep 5 (NZ)

Community mentors (NZ)
Local community groups (image)
Maori logo
Building relationships

Build relationships with Māori cultural and disability groups, such as Ngāti Kāpo o Aotearoa Inc. Invite them to the school. Encourage students to get involved in projects that provide authentic learning contexts.

Source: Ngāti Kāpo o Aotearoa Inc.

Local community groups
Connecting parents with each other (NZ) (video)
Ideas for families

Sharon Beattie, a parent of a child with low vision, shares her knowledge and experiences of what has worked for her family.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: BLENNZ (NZ)

Connecting parents with each other (NZ)

Resources and downloads

National mentoring service for Māori and Pasifika students

Details of the National Mentoring Service (a community-based initiative) supported by the Ministry of Education. It's aimed at supporting young Māori and Pasifika students, in a culturally responsive way, to successfully achieve NCEA.

Working as a community

The relationships between whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, kotahitanga, and rangatiratanga school culture to build school and community culture are explained. Networks of support that can be accessed are identified on this page from the Inclusive Practices website (NZ).

Using technologies (NZ) (video)
The benefits of connecting with the community

Technologies parents are familiar with, such as Facebook, webpages, and blogs, enable teachers to share with them what is happening in the class.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Enabling e-Learning (NZ)

Using technologies (NZ)
Modeling inclusion

Model your commitment to inclusion through information the school sends to or provides for whānau. Consider newsletters, websites, forms, and invitations. Include illustrated success stories about all students.

  • Share ongoing stories of your school's commitment to inclusive practices and next steps.
  • Make materials available in the languages of your school community.
  • Ensure that written material is supported with graphics to support understanding.
  • Clearly explain how parents can connect with teachers and support staff at your school to talk about their child.
  • Offer digital and hard copy materials, so that whānau can select an access option that works best for them.
  • Extend open invitations for parents to join the school parent or whānau group, and other groups they can belong and contribute to.
Modeling inclusion
Voluntary parental involvement (NZ) (video)
Developing relationships with whānau and communities

Research shows that voluntary parental involvement makes a difference for children.

View transcript

Source: Te Mangōroa (NZ)

Voluntary parental involvement (NZ)

Resources and downloads

Creating MASAM – Collaborating with the community

Parents, BOT members, and teachers from Motu School discuss collaborating to create a framework to support Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM) in this video.

Information for parents and caregivers of children with special education needs: Support organisations and useful contacts

A list of national organisations that support students with additional needs and their families, compiled by the Ministry of Education.

Rangiātea: Hamilton Girls' High School

This Hamilton Girls' High School exemplar explores how using whānau tutor classes, vertical tutor classes, and mentoring built powerful educational relationships at the school.

Te mana kōrero: The way forward

Keriana Tawhiwhirangi, Director of the Principals’ Development Association, gives advice on improving engagement with whānau.

Engaging whānau, Lincoln School (NZ) (video)
Building partnerships with whānau

Lincoln School staff talk about their commitment to working in partnership with whānau and how they seek feedback on what is working well and what can be improved.

No captions or transcript available

Source: He Kākano (NZ)

Engaging whānau, Lincoln School (NZ)
Support groups, Owairaka School (NZ) (video)
Family and whānau groups

Diana Tregoweth outlines some of the approaches in place at Owairaka School that support the development of family and whānau support groups.

View transcript

Source: NZ Curriculum Online (NZ)

Support groups, Owairaka School (NZ)

Resources and downloads

Supporting rangatahi with common sense solutions

John Murdoch, Newlands College Deputy Principal, reflects on his school’s experience setting up a whānau advisory group.

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Building an inclusive, culturally responsive classroom environment

Students are more likely to achieve when they see themselves and their culture reflected positively in subject matter and learning contexts.

A high school English teacher describes how she matches her teaching strategies and learning resources to the students’ interests, experiences, and needs.

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Closed captioning available in player

Suggestions and resources

Tikanga Māori in the classroom (NZ) (video)
Including all students

Teachers explain the need to incorporate te ao Māori, tikanga, and te reo Māori into learning contexts to include and engage all students.

View transcript

Source: He reo tupu, He reo ora (NZ)

Tikanga Māori in the classroom (NZ)
Understanding rangatahi who are Deaf (NZ) (video)
Ko Wai Au – Who am I? See my voice

Māori rangatahi who identify as Deaf help schools and communities to have a better understanding of their access and communication needs, and their aspirations.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education (NZ)

Understanding rangatahi who are Deaf (NZ)
Culturally responsive learning contexts

Creating culturally responsive learning contexts and co-constructing learning enables every student to bring their experiences into the classroom context.

  • Provide opportunities for Māori students who speak te reo Māori to teach the class some basic vocabulary.
  • Include holidays and festivals that are important to your Māori students in learning activities.
  • Establish classroom communication practices that include te reo Māori.
  • Support Māori students to understand new vocabulary or unfamiliar instructions by providing visual cues and translating key words into te reo Māori.
  • Identify how you can specifically include a Māori component into curriculum topics.
  • Engage with the Māori school community and whānau to bring their knowledge and expertise into the school.
Culturally responsive learning contexts
Co-constructing learning (NZ) (video)
Students bring their own experiences to the classroom

This video shows examples of culturally responsive contexts developed through co-construction.

View transcript

Source: Te Mangōroa (NZ)

Co-constructing learning (NZ)
Pronouncing student names

Take the time to learn how to pronounce your students’ names correctly.

Ask them to say their name, listen carefully, and repeat it until you know it. Model the correct pronunciation of students’ names to the class so that all students use the correct pronunciation.

Pronouncing student names

Resources and downloads

Supporting Māori students through ako-e (e-learning)

These stories and resources demonstrate how e-learning tools can be used to build relationships and engage with Māori learners, whānau, and iwi.

Create a supportive and inclusive learning environment

This resource explains strategies for creating an inclusive learning environment at senior secondary level.

Creating culturally safe schools for Māori students

This article presents findings about ways to create culturally safe classrooms. It focuses on ways teachers and schools can create inclusive environments for Māori students.

Culture speaks: Cultural relationships and classroom learning

A preview of this book, which discusses narratives drawn from the voices of Māori secondary students, their whānau, principals, and teachers.

Ruaumoko: The rumbling voice

An interactive digital book telling the story of Rūaumoko, the god of earthquakes and volcanoes. This narration is supported by text and audio in Te Reo Māori and English. The digital book is available from iTunes (apple) and Google Play (android).

Recognising passions and strengths (NZ) (video)
Providing leadership opportunities

Teachers recognised Wiremu Hamiora’s passion for sports. Giving Wiremu a leadership role has transformed him into a confident and passionate young person.

No captions or transcript available

Source: AttitudeLive (NZ)

Recognising passions and strengths (NZ)
Students as teachers (image)
NZC Scenario 65 Treaty 12
Utilise students’ strengths

Provide opportunities for Māori students who speak te reo Māori to teach the class vocabulary or tikanga.

Source: Ministry of Education

Students as teachers
Developing learning relationships (NZ) (video)
Finding out from students what works for them

Students give feedback on what works for them when they are learning, and what enables them to take the lead in their learning.

View transcript

Source: Te Mangōroa (NZ)

Developing learning relationships (NZ)
Buddy systems (NZ) (video)
Using a tuakana-teina approach

The tuakana-teina relationship provides the model for a buddy system. The older or more expert tuakana helps and guides the younger or less expert teina as these students create digital stories.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Enabling e-Learning (NZ)

Buddy systems (NZ)
Peer tutoring (NZ) (video)
Changing the classroom environment

Teacher, Tony Renshaw talks about student engagement and cooperative learning. Students are responsible for becoming expert in particular content areas and then tutoring their peers.

View transcript

Source: Te Mangōroa (NZ)

Peer tutoring (NZ)
Rangatahi communicate their aspirations (NZ) (video)
Ko Wai Au – Who am I? See my voice

Māori rangatahi who identify as Deaf help schools and communities to have a better understanding of their access and communication needs, and their aspirations.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education (NZ)

Rangatahi communicate their aspirations (NZ)
Authentic learning contexts (NZ) (video)
Using te reo Māori

Students are supported with text and visual cues in this cooperative activity.

In tuakana-teina relationships, experienced students support their peers.

View transcript

Source: He reo tupu, he reo ora (NZ)

Authentic learning contexts (NZ)
Sharing a mihi

They’d feel a lot more confident talking about something that they were certain about, like their heritage, rather than something that they had gone and taken out of, say, library books, to present to the class.

Source: Linda Sweeny, Associate Principal, Te Kura o Tiori Burnham School, Enabling e-Learning video
Sharing a mihi
Connecting culture to learning (NZ) (video)
Affirming students’ identity

This video provides an example of ako, where everyone in the classroom, including the teacher, is a learner.

View transcript

Source: Te Mangōroa (NZ)

Connecting culture to learning (NZ)
Being culturally responsive (NZ) (video)
Classroom pedagogy

Can your students bring their own experiences into the classroom and see that their experiences are legitimate, accepted, and valued?

View transcript

Source: Te Kotahitanga (NZ)

Being culturally responsive (NZ)
Improving literacy skills (NZ) (video)
Using Storybird

Teacher, Susan Lee describes the impact of using Storybird on literacy development. The tool removes the barrier of handwriting, freeing up students to write.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Enabling e-Learning (NZ)

Improving literacy skills (NZ)
Useful technologies

When writing, students may need to think of ideas, plan sentences, check grammar, check punctuation, spell words, and organise the structure of the piece. Break these processes into a number of discrete activities that are done one at a time, and remove barriers by using appropriate technologies.  

  • Support students by using speech-to-text so that they can communicate their ideas effectively.
  • Use recording devices to record ideas orally.
  • Use planning tools and mind maps, such as Inspiration, to organise ideas and provide a structure.

Use apps, such as iWordQ, to support reading text, word selection, spelling, and grammar.

Useful technologies
Improving boys’ writing (NZ) (video)
Using Google Docs

A teacher explains how using Google docs in class supported students’ writing (clip taken from a longer video).

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Enabling e-Learning (NZ)

Improving boys’ writing (NZ)
Ideas for presenting and sharing content
  1. Take a multisensory approach – use real experiences, physical activities, and manipulables to support understanding.

  2. Support text and spoken information with photos, graphics, audio, and video.

  3. Present digital text rather than printed text, so that students can personalise it (for example, by enlarging it or listening to it).

  4. Use blogs, wikis, and online tools such as Moodle to bring together different versions of content in one place (for example, a YouTube video, a graphic, and some text).

  5. Make instructions, demonstrations, or key content rewindable and accessible 24/7.

Ideas for presenting and sharing content

Resources and downloads

Point England School using technology to learn

In this video, a student from Point England School reports on how students use technology to learn, sharing their movies with the wider community.

Universal Design for Learning iPad strategies: Text-to-speech

A video introducing text-to-speech to access digital text. Developed by US educator Kit Hard.

Supporting Māori students through ako-e (e-learning)

These stories and resources demonstrate how e-learning tools can be used to build relationships and engage with Māori learners, whānau, and iwi.

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This is a Ministry of Education initiative

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