Welcome to Inclusive Education.


Making the curriculum accessible to all

http://inclusive.tki.org.nz/guides/making-the-curriculum-accessible-to-all/

Barriers to learning can be created, even by those with the best of intentions. They can be embedded in teaching methods, learning materials, assessment processes, options for expression, and even in the physical or online environment itself.

This guide suggests tools and strategies to help teachers create more flexible environments that support all learners, where barriers to learning are minimised. There are also specifc sections on supporting reading and writing, and differentiated instruction.

Reducing barriers for year 1–6 students

Take a look at your classroom, including your teaching strategies, assessment processes, materials and the ways you construct learning tasks or opportunities. Consider how it feels and works for your students. Ask them for ideas and feedback.

Primary teacher, Linda Ojala describes her inclusive approach to utilising a range of digital technologies to meet the wide and varied needs of students in her year 3 class.

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Closed captioning available in player

Suggestions and resources

Students teaching students (NZ) (video)
Developing tuakana-teina relationships

Students at Irongate School demonstrate how the older or more expert tuakana help and guide the younger or less expert teina.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Enabling e-Learning (NZ)

Students teaching students (NZ)
Suggestions for building confidence
  1. Ask the student how they learn best and get to know their interests and strengths.

  2. Foster tuakana-teina relationships, where an older or more expert tuakana (older child) helps and guides the younger or less expert teina (younger child).

  3. Identify and adapt situations where it may be embarrassing for a student to participate (for example, a student with dyslexia being expected to read aloud).

  4. Recognise successes and communicate them to home.

  5. Recognise avoidance strategies and provide support and encouragement.

  6. Build on the student’s out-of-school programmes and activities.

  7. Make support options such as text-to-speech, timers and self-management tools available to students.

  8. Give ongoing prompts and positive feedback and provide the student with strategies to help when they get stuck.

Suggestions for building confidence
Supporting motivation and resilience (NZ) (video)
Problem-solving at Stonefields School

Provide students with strategies for "getting out of the pit" when they get stuck in their learning.

View transcript

Source: Chris Bradbeer (NZ)

Supporting motivation and resilience (NZ)
Sharing beyond the classroom (NZ) (video)
School TV

Creating opportunities for students to share learning beyond the classroom can boost confidence and increase participation in learning.

No captions or transcript available

Source: School TV (NZ)

Sharing beyond the classroom (NZ)

Resources and downloads

John Hattie, visible learning Pt 2: Effective methods

In this video Dr John Hattie talks about the impact of a teacher’s mindset on student achievement. No captions or transcript available.

Multiple Means of Engagement - Managing Fear so Learning Can Occur

In this collection of short videos about Universal Design for Learning, Dr David Rose and CAST colleague Grace Meo explain how engagement, goals, affective demands, and resources are connected. Collated by the Alberta Regional Consortia.

Helping children to build self-esteem

In this video, Professor Amanda Kirby (UK) describes how to help children build self-esteem and confidence by giving specific positive feedback and building intrinsic motivation, through supporting students to set their own goals and identify steps to achieving them.

Digital books (image)
Milly, Molly Māori app
Personalising reading

Select books students can personalise to suit their reading preferences.

The Milly, Molly books have built-in supports. Readers can highlight the text, touch a word to hear it, listen to to the text read aloud and record narration.

 

Source: KIWA International Ltd

Digital books
Classroom content options

Suggestions for creating and presenting flexible information and content in more than one way

  1. Take a multisensory approach – use real experiences, physical activity, and manipulatives alongside text, images, and videos to support understanding.

  2. Always present information in more than one way – text, with audio and image; spoken instructions with graphics or charts and text.

  3. Present digital text rather than printed text so that students can personalise how they access, adjust, and manipulate it.

  4. Create content that can be easily revisited and accessed in different ways at different times.

  5. Use blogs, wikis, and online tools such as Moodle to bring together different versions of content in one place (for example, a YouTube video, a graphic and some text).

Classroom content options
Flexible digital materials (image)
Guide 2 AT strat 1 remote desk top poster frame.png
Supporting personalisation

Encourage students to adjust materials to suit their needs and preferences.

Introduce accessibility features, including how to change the contrast or font size or turn on text-to-speech.

Source: BLENNZ Learning Library (NZ)

Flexible digital materials
Using closed captioned videos (image)
Screen shot showing captions on website
Supporting understanding

Closed captions on videos provide access to spoken content for students with hearing impairment.

They also provide additional support for second language learners and alternative access for all students.

Source: Department of Conservation (NZ)

Using closed captioned videos

Resources and downloads

UDL guidelines

A coloured-coded overview of the UDL guidelines outlining the three principles and their associated guidelines and checkpoints. Developed by Cast.org

Multiple Means of Representation - Professional Development Resource

A multi-media online resource introducing the UDL principle of Representation. The resource contains videos by David Rose and Grace Meo from CAST, and accompanying text and powerpoint slides. Collated by the Alberta Regional Consortia.

What is UDL (Universal Design for Learning)?

A collection of short videos and supporting resources from the Alberta UDL Summer Institute 2011. The material explores what is UDL, why it matters, and how it might be used to support the learning of all students. Presenters included David Rose, Grace Meo and Jeff Diedrich.

Representation

In this video on the UDL: Supporting diversity in BC schools website, Canadian teachers share some of the ways they prepare learning materials to address diverse student needs in their classrooms. No captions or transcript available.

6 Ways to Engage Every Learner using UDL

Informative blog post by Stephen Noonoo highlighting the benefits of using a UDL approach to engage and support all learners.

Environments to support thinking (NZ) (video)
Options at St Mary’s School, Mosgiel

Flexible learning environments enable students to adjust and adapt them to meet their needs.

Innovation in reducing distractions can lead to unique solutions.

View transcript

Source: EDtalks (NZ)

Environments to support thinking (NZ)
Supporting organisation skills

Suggestions for supporting students’ organisation and processing skills

  1. Label key areas of the classroom and resources with visual and text labels. Encourage students to label their own resources in ways that work for them.

  2. Use charts, visual calendars, colour coded schedules, visible timers, and cues to increase the predictability of regular activities and transitions.

  3. Make available graphic organisers and flow charts to support planning and thinking in all curriculum areas.

  4. Highlight patterns, critical features, big ideas, and relationships, using visuals, mind maps, 3-D manipulatives, outlines, flow charts, and real objects.

  5. Expect to explain things many times in different ways: use real experiences, physical activity, and manipulatives alongside text, images, and videos to support understanding.

  6. Make available, and encourage students to select, working environments and tools that support learning (for example, accessing quiet space, wearing headphones to reduce sound or to listen to music, working with a buddy).

Supporting organisation skills
Using mind maps (image)
A mind map
Supporting understanding

Model the use of colour, symbols, and images alongside text when using mind maps.

Encourage students to use mind maps to support thinking and organise ideas.

Source: Barrett Discovery

Using mind maps
Designing online environments

Considerations when designing effective online environments, such as class blogs

  1. Keep the design simple.

  2. Use a clear predictable structure to help students find what they need.

  3. Reduce visual and auditory clutter, and bling (students with ADHD and autism may also find this strategy useful).

  4. Support navigation with both high contrast text and visual cues.

  5. Check with students that the way you are organising instructions and resources is working for them.

  6. Hyperlink to learning support tools (for example, visual dictionaries, graphic organisers, text to speech tools).

Designing online environments

Resources and downloads

Graphic Organizers

Advice about how to support students in the effective use of a variety of graphic organisers on the Resources for Teachers website.

Free technology toolkit for UDL in all classrooms

A collection of free tools and resources, aligned to Universal Design for Learning approach, that support students in their learning.

Interactives: Geometry 3D shapes

An example of a collection of 3D interactives used to illustrate concepts visually.

Using netbooks at Parkvale Primary (NZ) (video)
A 1-1 netbook programme

Teva, a year-5 student, his mum, and teacher Kieren Moriarty, reflect on the impact a netbook and collaborative online environments have made to Teva, a student who found writing a chore.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Enabling e-Learning (NZ)

Using netbooks at Parkvale Primary (NZ)
Ways to show what you know (image)
A list of ways to show what you know
Developing success criteria

Brainstorm ways students can demonstrate their learning. Introduce students to new forms of expression and encourage an innovative use of digital technologies and the creative arts. Use this “Show what you know” pdf as a starting point.

Source: For the teachers blog

Ways to show what you know
Ensuring student success
  1. Develop success criteria in partnership with students.

  2. Where possible, set goals that enable students to demonstrate their understanding through multiple pathways.

  3. Offer students a range of options for expression including text, images, voice, video, animation or a combination of media.

  4. Ensure that the “means” of demonstrating understanding is not a barrier to success.

  5. If the “means” are a barrier for some students, build in supports such as text-to-speech at the outset.

  6. Make all supports and options available to everyone (view the Assistive Technology guide for more information).

Ensuring student success
Using digital technologies to collaborate (NZ) (video)
Supporting collaborative learning

Teacher, Vimi Chandry describes how she uses collaborative planning tools such as Google Docs, matched to learner needs, to raise literacy levels.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Enabling e-Learning (NZ)

Using digital technologies to collaborate (NZ)

Resources and downloads

Teacher actions that promote student learning

Suggested actions for teachers with accompanying questions to promote discussion and reflection on how to create an environment that supports the learning of all students.

Knowing my learners (Linda Ojala)

An online conversation with Silverstream School teacher, Linda Ojala, and other teachers about knowing your learners and using that knowledge – from the Universal Design for Learning Group in the Ministry of Education’s Virtual Learning Network.

Quality teaching for diverse students in schooling: Best evidence synthesis iteration (BES)

This BES is intended to contribute to the development of an evidence-base for policy and practice in schooling. It covers quality teaching, pedagogical practices and creating effective links between schools and other cultural contexts in which students are socialised, to facilitate learning.

Different ways to publish your stories: Using a variety of tools

UK teacher Jacqui Sharp illustrates some of the ways students and teachers can present digital stories and inquiries, using many different tools.

Back to top

Reducing barriers for year 7–13 students

Take a look at your classroom, including your teaching strategies, assessment processes, materials and the ways you construct learning tasks or opportunities. Consider how it feels and works for your students. Ask them for ideas and feedback.

Students at Albany Senior High School describe what works for them in their learning environment.

Source: EDtalks (NZ)

No captions or transcript available

Suggestions and resources

Connecting with students’ passions (NZ) (video)
Increasing engagement and success

A student with autism and cerebral palsy demonstrates his passion for te reo Māori.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Te Karere TVNZ (NZ)

Connecting with students’ passions (NZ)
Ideas for building confidence
  1. Ask students how they learn best.

  2. Use students’ interests and strengths as a basis for teaching.

  3. Recognise and eliminate situations that students find embarrassing, such as reading aloud or making speeches.

  4. Feed back successes to students’ parents and whānau.

  5. Recognise avoidance strategies and provide support and encouragement.

  6. Give students extra time so they have the satisfaction of completing work.

  7. Make learning supports such as timers, text-to-speech, and organisational tools available to students.

  8. Enable students to show their strengths and contribute their ideas in collaborative work, without the challenge of lengthy reading and writing tasks.

  9. Give specific prompts and feedback quickly, rather than waiting for the student to fail.

Ideas for building confidence
Encouraging sustained participation
  1. Use your knowledge of a student’s interests and create opportunities where the student can take the lead.

  2. Break work into chunks. Give ongoing prompts and positive feedback and provide strategies to help when students get stuck.

  3. Establish classroom routines and, when possible, provide advance notice of when a routine is to be disrupted.

  4. Before changing the layout of the physical environment, provide students with a visual and spoken description of the new layout and information about when the change will happen.

  5. Recognise avoidance strategies and provide support and encouragement.

  6. Provide easy access to quiet spaces so that students can manage and avoid sensory overload.

Encouraging sustained participation
Checking students’ well-being (image)
Bored girl
Notice and act

Teachers need to be alert for signs that a student is feeling bad about themselves as a learner or that their contributions are not valued.

Discuss observations with the wider team.

Source: Adreson

Checking students’ well-being

Resources and downloads

Authentic learning experiences facilitated through a wiki

French teacher Sarah Collett and two of her students from Hillcrest High School describe the usefulness of using a wiki to create and enhance authentic language-learning experiences in this video. Closed captions available.

Writing online at Tamaki College (NZ) (video)
The impact of digital writing environments

The HoD of English at Tamaki College talks about how access to online writing environments is impacting on  student writing.

Part of a longer video, Tamaki College's approach to differentiation.

No captions or transcript available

Source: English Online TKI (NZ)

Writing online at Tamaki College (NZ)
Using graphic calculators (NZ) (video)
Using an accessible graphic calculator

A student with low vision demonstrates how the online graphic calculator he prefers to use in class is a useful tool for others.

No captions or transcript available

Source: BLENNZ1 (NZ)

Using graphic calculators (NZ)
Flexible learning materials

Suggestions for presenting flexible learning materials

  1. Use multimedia rather than text-only material.

  2. Build in connections to prior knowledge, big ideas and patterns. Make effective use of hyperlinks.

  3. Make instructions, demonstrations or key content rewindable and accessible 24/7.

  4. Use digital rather than hard copy formats so that students can access content in different ways and personalise it to suit their needs.

  5. Avoid using handouts or workbooks that can’t be adjusted.

  6. Include supports such as visual dictionaries, word definitions, and highlighting tools.

Flexible learning materials
Effective online environments

Suggestions for designing effective online environments

  1. Keep the design simple.

  2. Use a clear predictable structure to help students find what they need.

  3. Reduce visual and auditory clutter and bling (students with ADHD and autism may also find this strategy useful).

  4. Support navigation with both high contrast text and visual cues.

  5. Check with students that the way you are organising instructions and resources is working for them.

  6. Hyperlink to visual calendars and mind mapping options to support planning.

Effective online environments

Resources and downloads

Graphic organizers

A collation of free graphic organisers from the Universal Design for Learning toolkit. These include hardcopy, App organisers, Chrome extensions, and computer options.

Free technology toolkit for UDL in all classrooms

A collection of free tools and resources, aligned to Universal Design for Learning approach, that support students in their learning.

Multiple Means of Action and Expression - Professional Development Resource

A multi-media online resource introducing the UDL principle of Action and Expression. The resource contains short videos by David Rose and Grace Meo from CAST, and accompanying text and powerpoint slides. Collated by the Alberta Regional Consortia.

Problem-solving, Fraser High (NZ) (video)
Helping students manage their own learning

A student at Fraser High School reflects on managing her learning (one section of a longer video).

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Enabling e-Learning (NZ)

Problem-solving, Fraser High (NZ)
Supporting concentration and memory

Ideas for supporting concentration and short-term memory

  1. Monitor and moderate the classroom for visual and auditory distractions.

  2. Present information in a range of ways over an extended period of time (for example, a week) to help students retain information, build up their understanding and familiarity of the topic, and stay stimulated and focused.

  3. Discuss the effectiveness of the classroom with students and remove barriers and make modifications where needed.

  4. In online environments make effective use of visual prompts and cues to support understanding and navigation. Make useful hyperlinks to background knowledge or previous learning to increase connections.

  5. Schedule regular short breaks to allow students to move around.

Supporting concentration and memory
Supporting planning and organising

Suggestions for supporting students’ planning and organising

  1. Use charts, visual calendars, colour coded schedules, visible timers and cues to increase the predictability of regular activities and transitions.

  2. Encourage students to use their mobile devices to schedule alerts and reminders for regular and novel events and task deadlines.

  3. Highlight patterns, critical features, big ideas and relationships, using visuals, mind maps, 3-D manipulatives, outlines, flow charts, and real objects.

  4. Model and make available graphic organisers and flow charts to support planning and thinking in all curriculum areas.

  5. Break tasks and lengthy assignments into small manageable parts. Schedule workflow using Trello to organise what needs to be done and when.

  6. Provide options so that students can submit work online.

Supporting planning and organising
Using visual timers (image)
Guide 1 tech strat 3 2 poster frame time timer
Supporting time management

For many students, especially those with ADHD and autism, being able to see a visual representation of time passing is useful. Search “visual timers” online, access the Time Timer Apps, or visit the link in the resources section to find timers that might be useful for your students.

Source: Time Timer (US)

Using visual timers

Resources and downloads

Free technology toolkit for UDL in all classrooms

A collection of free tools and resources, aligned to Universal Design for Learning approach, that support students in their learning.

Graphic organizers

A wide range of graphic organisers from Education Oasis that can be printed and some that can be filled out online. These are also useful as a starting point for creating students’ own designs.

SET Connections – Executive function resources (Apps/Tools)

Apps to support executive function.

Benefits of text-to-speech (video)
Impact of the Missouri Text-to-Speech Pilot Program

Students describe the difference that having access to text-to-speech has made to their achievement.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: National Center on Aim (US)

Benefits of text-to-speech
Options for student expression

Provide options for students to express what they know in a variety of ways

  1. Create opportunities where students can personalise learning tasks and projects and build on their knowledge, experience and strengths.

  2. Develop success criteria with the students.

  3. Encourage independent and collaborative work in different formats, such as mind maps, videos, photos, podcasts and diagrams.

  4. Make learning support tools available to all students across the curriculum, for example, text-to-speech, graphic organisers, planning tools, storyboards, voice recorders.

  5. Use collaboration, peer mentoring and cooperative learning models.

  6. Assess understanding and presentation separately.

  7. In exams and assessments, provide a reader-writer who reads the questions aloud and writes down the student’s answers.

Options for student expression
Ways to show what you know (image)
A list of ways to show what you know
Encouraging and valuing creativity

Provide students with a range of options and supports to enable them to confidently and creatively express their thinking.

Source: For the teachers blog

Ways to show what you know
Multimedia tools (image)
Using a computer to write
Using technologies as tools for students to express what they know

Select tools that offer multiple ways for students to create and share their learning.

Source: CORE Education (NZ)

Multimedia tools

Resources and downloads

Teacher actions that promote student learning

Suggested actions for teachers with accompanying questions to promote discussion and reflection on how to create an environment that supports the learning of all students.

Universal Design for Learning iPad strategies: Text-to-speech

A video with US educator Kit Hard demonstrating how to introduce text-to-speech to access digital text. No captions or transcript available

MyStudyBar

This is a free floating toolbar for Windows desktops and netbooks that provides a suite of portable open-source applications to support learning.

Free technology toolkit for UDL in all classrooms

A collection of free tools and resources, aligned to Universal Design for Learning approach, that support students in their learning.

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Supporting reading and writing

Design learning tasks and experiences based on your knowledge of students as learners and on evidence of their strengths and learning needs.

Effective teachers actively involve students in their own learning and assessment, make learning outcomes transparent to students, offer specific, constructive and regular feedback, and ensure that assessment practices impact positively on students' motivation. Assessment can improve teaching and learning when teachers adjust their teaching to take account of the results of assessment.

Source: Quality teaching for diverse students in schooling: Best evidence synthesis (p 89)

Suggestions and resources

Using Google Docs (NZ) (video)
Improving boys’ writing

Anna Swan describes her teacher inquiry into using Google Docs to build student engagement and achievement. 

Student attitudes towards writing became more positive as barriers were removed (part of a longer video).

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Enabling e-Learning (NZ)

Using Google Docs (NZ)
Using netbooks (NZ) (video)
Using netbooks to support writing

Using a netbook gives Tyler the freedom to write creatively rather than being inhibited by the speed of his handwriting or his ability to form letters.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Enabling e-Learning (NZ)

Using netbooks (NZ)
Independent reading (NZ) (video)
Reading to self

Teacher, Linda Ojala explains it is important to offer students a choice and allow them to be responsible for themselves, in the space that they feel comfortable reading in.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Independent reading (NZ)
Technology supporting literacy (NZ) (video)
Using technology to support independence

Primary teacher, Linda Ojala describes how she utilises online tools such as Reading Eggs to support student autonomy in literacy.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Technology supporting literacy (NZ)

Resources and downloads

Inclusion in practice

Examples illustrating how teachers supported all the students in their class to fully engage across the New Zealand Curriculum learning. Each example uses the Teaching as Inquiry model to demonstrate effective strategies.

The School Journal Story Library

School Journal Story Library is a targeted instructional series that supplements other instructional series. It provides additional scaffolds and supports for teachers to use to accelerate literacy learning for students in years 5-8 who are reading 1-2 years below expectation. The series includes books, teacher support materials, and audio.

Connected

Connected promotes scientific, technological, and mathematical literacy. NZ curriculum-related content engages students in years 4-8 with real-life science and technology-related issues and authentic, context-based mathematical explorations.

Writing hub

These resources from Literacy Online will help strengthen your knowledge and skills for teaching writing across the curriculum and increasing students’ rate of progress.

Jigsaw reading: Social studies, years 5–6

The Jigsaw Approach, where expert learners are grouped with those that need support, in action is demonstrated in this video.

Literacy progressions

On this site you will find the reading and writing progressions in child friendly language. These have been put together by New Zealand teachers for teachers and students.

Strategies to support writing (NZ) (video)
Questioning as a tool to extend writing

Sandra Gillies, Onslow College, explains how she poses questions for students to support them with expanding and organising their writing.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Strategies to support writing (NZ)
Literacy learning tools

Introducing students to free or inexpensive tools that remove barriers and provide support for literacy learning

  • Text-to-speech (TTS) software converts text from a website or digital document into speech by reading written information aloud. The text is often highlighted with word tracking. Explore TTS on Mac operating systems, Natural Reader, Read and Write for Google Docs
  • Word prediction software predicts a required word, as a student writes, producing a list of words. Explore LetMeType
  • Voice-recognition software offers students an alternative way of getting their thoughts down on paper.
  • Clutter free web pages. Explore Readability or use the Reader function on Mac operating systems.
  • Spell and contextual grammar checkers. Explore Ginger for Chrome.
  • Closed Captions (subtitles). Turn them on when sharing videos with students.
  • Graphic organiser software (free) with outlining and drafting capabilities can be used to support writers in a number of ways.
  • Research tools and productivity tools support time management and personal organisation.
  • Digital storytelling tools are available on Powerpoint and Google Sites. Movie making tools are also available.
Literacy learning tools
Strategies to support reading (NZ) (video)
Decoding difficult words

Sandra Gillies, Onslow College, outlines the importance of thinking aloud to model the process of decoding, facilitating students connecting with their background knowledge to build meaning.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Strategies to support reading (NZ)
Using digital resources (NZ) (video)
Supporting flexible options for participation

Matthew, a year 13 student, describes how "the best teachers" are those who create flexible, digital resources.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Enabling e-Learning (NZ)

Using digital resources (NZ)

Resources and downloads

Writers Lab – a writing strategy to support students with disabilities

A process to support students with additional needs to write accounts and narrative.

MyStudyBar

This is a free floating toolbar for Windows desktops and netbooks that provides a suite of portable open-source applications to support learning.

Web 2.0 tools and apps

A list of free, open-source, online tools, curated by Albany Senior and Junior High School.

The School Journal Story Library

School Journal Story Library is a targeted instructional series that supplements other instructional series. It provides additional scaffolds and supports for teachers to use to accelerate literacy learning for students in years 5-8 who are reading 1-2 years below expectation. The series includes books, teacher support materials, and audio.

Inclusion in practice

Examples illustrating how teachers supported all the students in their class to fully engage across the New Zealand Curriculum learning. Each example uses the Teaching as Inquiry model to demonstrate effective strategies.

Utilising text-to-speech tools (video)
Introduce students to alternative ways of accessing text

In this video tutorial, US educator and UDL consultant, Kit Hard explains how to use text-to-speech to access digital text across the curriculum.

View transcript

Source: Kit Hard YouTube channel (US)

Utilising text-to-speech tools
Digital tools for all learners (image)
Examples of universal supports
Increasing access and options

Take a universal approach to offering access options and support.

Make common digital tools available to all students across the curriculum.

Source: Chrissie Butler, CORE Education

Digital tools for all learners
Digital storytelling (NZ) (video)
Introducing Storybird

Storybird, a free digital story writing tool, has improved student literacy at Te Kura o Kutarere by providing pictures as a support and removing the barriers created by writing by hand.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Enabling e-Learning (NZ)

Digital storytelling (NZ)
Graphics and mind maps (image)
Mind map created in Popplet
Using graphics and mind maps to support planning

Encourage students to use mindmapping with text and images before writing to get their ideas down.

Source: Catriona Pene, CORE Education

Graphics and mind maps

Resources and downloads

Engaging reluctant writers using e-learning tools

A slideshare presentation by New Zealand learning with digital technologies facilitator Catriona Pene, containing a wide range of easily-accessible, online resources and apps for improving writing.

MyStudyBar

This is a free floating toolbar for Windows desktops and netbooks that provides a suite of portable open-source applications to support learning.

Identifying barriers in materials

Use this checklist to review how typical materials in your classroom may be a barrier to student learning. This is part of a free online tutorial on the CAST website.

The electronic story books

The Ministry of Education’s Electronic Storybook is a targeted instructional series designed for teachers to accelerate the literacy achievement of students in years 5–8 who are 2–3 years below expectations and requiring language and literacy support.

Popular movies help children improve literacy

A study by the University of Canterbury (NZ) showed that using captions not only significantly improved literacy levels, particularly among Māori and Pasifika students, but also reduced students’ truancy through engagement.

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Strategies for differentiating or adapting instruction

Within a flexible learning environment, where barriers to learning have been minimised and supports and options made available to all, there will still be a need to differentiate learning for particular students in specific contexts.

Every student is unique and deserves instruction beyond one-size-fits-all.

Source: Smartatmath's channel (US) 

No captions or transcript available

Suggestions and resources

Areas to differentiate

Areas where adaptations and differentiations might be needed

  1. The amount of work or size of projects may need to be altered.

  2. Encouragement to complete work in small, manageable chunks. Students beginning a big project may need help organising an individual plan for completing it.

  3. Smaller projects with a gradual work up toward larger ones (for students who tire easily).

  4. More time to complete in-class tasks.

  5. Support for managing perfectionism, for example, being too fussy and not completing tasks on time.

  6. Flexible time schedules. Make assignments due over the course of several days or even weeks. Provide a time range during which an assignment may be submitted.

Source: Inclusive classroom teacher resource

Areas to differentiate
Selecting classroom resources (NZ) (video)
Matching resources to the student

A classroom teacher describes how she differentiates learning supports for students and selects resources matched to students’ experiences and interests to help students achieve explicit learning outcomes. 

Closed captioning available in player

Source: ESOL online TKI (NZ)

Selecting classroom resources (NZ)
Planning adaptations

When planning a unit of work, some teachers find it helpful to ask:

  • Do I need to make any adjustments at all?
  • Would technology help some/all students?
  • Do some students need material presented differently?
  • Should some students present their work differently?
  • Will all students be assessed in the same way?
  • Will some students need additional or different goals?

Some students with a disability will not need any adaptations because of their disability. However, like other students they may require adaptations for other reasons such as they haven’t caught on to decimals or they have no friends.

When you adapt or differentiate the curriculum, be careful that you do not unnecessarily simplify it. You could be depriving students of the opportunity to achieve the same learning outcomes as their peers.

Source: Students with disabilities in mainstream classrooms: A resource for teachers

Planning adaptations

Resources and downloads

Differentiation and adaptation

Information and examples supporting teachers with planning, developing, and reviewing the classroom curriculum to meet the needs of all learners.

Students with disabilities in mainstream classrooms: A resource for teachers

This booklet, from the Australian Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, provides practical information and strategies for teachers.

Introduction to differentiation and adaptation of the classroom curriculum and school environment worksheet

Worksheet from Ministry of Education workshops on adaptations and differentiations. Worksheet includes useful template for identifying adaptations and differentiations.

UDL Intersections

This short paper provides an overview of the differences and intersection between Universal Design for Learning and Differentiated Instruction. Developed by CAST.

Universal Design for Learning FAQ

Answers to common questions asked about the compatibility of Universal Design for Learning and Differentiated Instruction.

Differentiation in science (NZ) (video)
Using differentiated levels of support

A teacher describes how in science lessons she differentiates materials to ensure that they are comprehensible to all students in years 7–8. These differentiated supports help students achieve the same explicit learning outcomes. 

Closed captioning available in player

Source: ESOL online (NZ)

Differentiation in science (NZ)
Differentiation, Tamaki College (NZ) (video)
Tamaki College’s approach to differentiation

The impact of one-to-one technologies on differentiation.

No captions or transcript available

Source: English Online (NZ)

Differentiation, Tamaki College (NZ)
Areas to differentiate

Areas where teachers may need to adapt or differentiate instruction

  1. Altering the amount of work or size of projects.

  2. Encouragement to complete work in small, manageable chunks. Students beginning a big project may need help organising an individual plan for completing it.

  3. Planning smaller projects with a gradual work up toward larger ones (for students who tire easily).

  4. Allowing more time to complete in-class tasks.

  5. Supporting students to manage perfectionism, for example, their being too fussy and not completing tasks on time.

  6. Creating flexible time schedules. Make assignments due over the course of several days or even weeks. Provide a time range during which an assignment may be submitted.

Source: Inclusive classroom teacher resource

Areas to differentiate
Planning adaptations

When planning a unit of work, some teachers find it helpful to ask:

  • Do I need to make any adjustments at all?
  • Would technology help some/all students?
  • Do some students need material presented differently?
  • Should some students present their work differently?
  • Will all students be assessed in the same way?
  • Will some students need additional or different goals?

Some students with a disability will not need any adaptations or differentiations. However, like other students they may require adaptations for other reasons such as they haven’t caught on to decimals or they have no friends.

When you adapt or differentiate the curriculum, be careful that you do not unnecessarily simplify it. You could be depriving students of the opportunity to achieve the same learning outcomes as their peers.

Source: Students with disabilities in mainstream classrooms: A resource for teachers

Planning adaptations

Resources and downloads

Differentiation and adaptation

Information and examples supporting teachers with planning, developing, and reviewing the classroom curriculum to meet the needs of all learners.

Collaboration for success: Individual education plans

Powerpoint from Ministry of Education workshop on adaptations and differentiations.

Introduction to differentiation and adaptation of the classroom curriculum and school environment worksheet

Worksheet from Ministry of Education workshops on adaptations and differentiations. Worksheet includes useful template for identifying adaptations and differentiations.

Students with disabilities in mainstream classrooms: A resource for teachers

This booklet, from the Australian Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, provides practical information and strategies for teachers.

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