Welcome to Inclusive Education.


Developing an inclusive classroom culture

http://inclusive.tki.org.nz/guides/developing-an-inclusive-classroom-culture/

An inclusive classroom is one that values the contributions of all students, their families/whānau, and communities. It recognises that every learner is unique and builds on their languages, cultures, and interests; and identifies and removes any barriers to achievement.

Valuing what each student brings to the classroom

Many aspects of students' lives – their language and culture, their interests, experiences, and needs – remain hidden unless we actively include them in class teaching and learning.

John Robinson, HoD Learning Support at Onslow College, reflects on how inclusive practice is developing across the school.

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ) 

Closed captioning available in player

Suggestions and resources

Knowing your learner (NZ)
(video)
Knowing your learner to create an inclusive classroom

Linda Ojala describes how she designs learning that works for all students.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Knowing your learner (NZ)
See my voice (NZ) (video)
Ko wai au? Who am I? See my voice?

Six rangatahi who identify as Deaf communicate their aspirations. 

Closed captioning available in player

Source: The Ministry of Education (NZ)

See my voice (NZ)
The student’s culture (image)
Figure 17 Phonebook exploration
Building understanding of a student’s culture

The culture of the child cannot enter the classroom until it has first entered the consciousness of the teacher.

Source: BLENNZ

The student’s culture
Relating to students (NZ) (video)
Strengthening relationships

Liz Crisp of Mangere Bridge School talks about finding connections with students.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Pasifika Education Community TKI (NZ)

Relating to students (NZ)
Finding out where students are from (video)
Whakapapa - where are you from?

Create intentional and ongoing opportunities for students to share where they are from, what is import to them and why.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Matapuna Training Centre (NZ)

Finding out where students are from

Resources and downloads

Mihimihi

Basic information on the background and purpose of mihimihi, including a simple example.

Quality teaching for diverse students in schooling: Best evidence synthesis iteration (BES)

This BES is intended to contribute to the development of an evidence-base for policy and practice in schooling. It covers quality teaching, pedagogical practices and creating effective links between schools and other cultural contexts in which students are socialised, to facilitate learning.

Strengthening relationships

Teachers and students describe how they connect with Pasifika learners and integrate their culture into learning to strengthen relationships and support learners to succeed socially and academically.

Knowing all students

Information to support teachers with knowing their learners so they can help them recognise their competencies, demonstrate their strengths, and work towards their aspirations. Accessed from the Inclusive Practices website (NZ).

Sample learner profile (image)
Learner profile
Who am I?

learner profile can be created in any format including:

  • a document with photos
  • a slide presentation with a series of pictures
  • a video
  • a blog.

Source: Ministry of Education (NZ)

Sample learner profile
What to include in a profile

The purpose of a learner profile can be agreed by the student, their whānau, and the teacher.

Depending on its purpose, a useful profile (whether an official document or simply inquiry on your part) can include:

  1. important people

  2. cultural connections and experiences

  3. languages spoken

  4. things the student is good at

  5. memorable life experiences

  6. how they like to unwind and relax

  7. likes and interests

  8. dislikes and things they avoid

  9. how they like to learn and what helps

  10. things that make it hard for them to learn

  11. what they do when they need help.

What to include in a profile
Learner profile benefits

A learner profile tells teachers about a student. It sits alongside assessment data. It helps school staff to build relationships with students and to understand things from a student’s perspective. This can inform planning, classroom layout, timetabling, and student supports.

Developing a learner profile means your students can:

  • express who they are
  • address assumptions
  • express their aspirations and passions
  • have a say in what goes on for them.

Senior students may prefer to just have a conversation. Take time to get the student’s views of what will support their learning.

Learner profile benefits
Surveying students

In the video Student Profiles, Canadian secondary teacher Naryn Searcy describes how she asks students about how they learn most effectively. She also asks students what is important to them beyond school.

She uses this information in her planning:

"I personally do a survey at the beginning of every class every semester, just everything from personal background to their history in the subject area to things they like to do outside of school, usually put a whole bunch of activities down there that we would potentially do in the class and ask them to rank it, you know what would you enjoy doing, what would you not like doing.

So just to get an idea of who is in the classroom to begin with and what they would benefit, or what they want to see in the class, what would work for them."

Source: Student profiles – UDL supporting diversity in BC schools (Canada)

Surveying students

Resources and downloads

Rachel's learner profile (NZ high school)

An example of a secondary student’s learner profile.

Laiza’s transition

An example of a primary school student’s learner profile, developed by the adults around her.

Stephen’s letter

Stephen introduces himself to his teachers before starting at Garin College in Nelson.

Developing learner profiles

This document provides general support and guidance when developing a learner profile. It includes prompts and questions, along side purpose and benefits for students.

Pasifika dual language books

A series of texts to help new entrant Pasifika children transition to English medium schools. These early reading books come in five Pasifika languages (Gagana Sāmoa, Lea Faka-Tonga, Cook Islands Māori, Gagana Tokelau, and Vagahau Niue) and English.

Flexible learning environments (NZ) (video)
Teaching approaches – Down Syndrome

Brooke Houghton from Onslow College describes how she designs flexible learning environments. 

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Flexible learning environments (NZ)
Students’ interests (image)
Questions for students to use when developing a learner profile
Knowledge about learners informs learning design

Silverstream teacher, Linda Ojala, creates learning opportunities that connect to her students’ interests and experiences and enable them to develop them further. 

Source: Ministry of Education (NZ)

Students’ interests
Classroom approaches – Dyslexia (NZ) (video)
Flexible supports

Primary teacher Linda Ojala describes how she builds specific supports and choices for students with dyslexia into her planning.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Classroom approaches – Dyslexia (NZ)
Culturally responsive teaching (NZ) (video)
Changing Māori education

Russell Bishop talks about incorporating culturally responsive pedagogy.

View transcript

Source: Te Kotahitanga (NZ)

Culturally responsive teaching (NZ)

Resources and downloads

Ruaumoko: The rumbling voice

An interactive digital book telling the story of Rūaumoko, the god of earthquakes and volcanoes. This narration is supported by text and audio in Te Reo Māori and English. The digital book is available from iTunes (apple) and Google Play (android).

My World My View

The Ministry of Education spoke to children who will enjoy a more inclusive world under the revised disability strategy. This video shares their take on inclusion in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Discipline, democracy and diversity: Creating culturally safe learning environments

A slide presentation of Angus Macfarlane’s bicultural framework and approach to inclusive education, (University of Waikato, 2009)

Learning better together: Working towards inclusive education in New Zealand schools

This booklet published by the IHC outlines how inclusive education can work in practice in our schools. It gives specific guidance to schools on how to achieve better learning for all students in classrooms.

Sharing a mihi

Video story of students developing and sharing their mihimihi from Enabling e-Learning (NZ).

Tātaiako: Cultural competencies for teachers of Māori learners

Tātaiako is a resource explaining competencies teachers need to develop so they can help Māori learners achieve educationally as Māori. It was developed by the Ministry of Education, the Teachers Council and a reference group of academics, teacher education practitioners, and iwi representatives involved in iwi educational initiatives.

Engaging student languages (NZ) (video)
Create bilingual and multilingual opportunities

Rae Siʻilata, lecturer in bi-literacy, urges educators to create opportunities for students to bring their language into the classroom.  

Consider ways to Create opportunities for students to learn their own language.

 

No captions or transcript available

Source: The New Zealand Curriculum online

Engaging student languages (NZ)
Connecting experiences to learning (NZ) (video)
Authentic materials

Donna Wheeler from Onslow College describes how she selects learning materials that connect to student's experiences.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, Inclusive Education (NZ)

Connecting experiences to learning (NZ)
NZ Sign Language (NZ) (video)
Everyday signing

A parent describes how New Zealand Sign Language was introduced into her daughter’s school.

View transcript

Source: Te Toi Tupu (NZ)

NZ Sign Language (NZ)
Using first language texts (NZ) (video)
Using first language texts in reading

A teacher describes how she uses Samoan language texts with her Samoan students. 

View transcript

Source: ESOL Online (NZ)

Using first language texts (NZ)
Authentic contexts (NZ) (video)
Authentic learning contexts and engagement

Julie McLaughlin recounts how she adjusted lesson contexts to make them relevant. 

View transcript

Source: Te Mangōroa(NZ)

Authentic contexts (NZ)

Resources and downloads

Thumbs Up! New Zealand Sign Language

An introduction to New Zealand Sign Language that supports teaching and learning NZSL as an additional language in English-medium schools for students in years 7–8.

Tim’s costume – Ready to Read

Some Ready to Read series titles that are available in NZSL.

iTunes preview: Hairy Maclary from Donaldson's Dairy

This book is available as an interactive QBook. It has video narration in three sign languages; NZSL, AUSLAN, and ASL.

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Establishing a caring, supportive, and respectful class climate

“Becoming more inclusive is a matter of thinking and talking; reviewing and refining practice; and making attempts to develop a more inclusive culture.”

Source: Muijs et al, 2011, p. 92 Collaboration and Networking in Education

“Respect comes with love and understanding each kid’s abilities.”

(Kliewer & Biklen, 2001, p.11) cited in Springboards to Practice, Ministry of Education

Image source: Ministry of Education

Suggestions and resources

New views of diversity

“Diversity” needs to be recognised as a strength for a future-oriented learning system, something to be actively fostered, not a weakness that lowers the system’s performance.

Diversity encompasses everyone’s variations and differences, including their cultures and backgrounds.

This calls for greater engagement of learners, family/whānau and communities in co-shaping education to address their needs, strengths, interests and aspirations, while also ensuring that all students—no matter where they are from or where their learning happens—have opportunities to develop and succeed according to the high level educational aspirations set for, and agreed to, by New Zealanders as a whole.

Rachel Bolstad and Jane Gilbert, with Sue McDowall, Ally Bull, Sally Boyd and Rosemary Hipkins ; Source: Supporting future-oriented learning and teaching: A New Zealand perspective
New views of diversity
Including all learners (video)
Students talk about inclusion

In the first part of this video students share their views on what inclusion means to them.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Including all learners
Markers of difference

In Springboards to Practice, students identify common markers of difference.

  1. Timetables.

  2. Lunchtime experiences.

  3. The language and messages used in the school about disability or learning support.

  4. Physical access to playgrounds and buildings.

  5. Pull-out programmes.

  6. Planning for trips.

  7. Technology use.

  8. How mobility support is offered to the student. 

Source: Adapted from Springboards to Practice

Markers of difference
How teachers can help (NZ) (video)
Having dyslexia – How teachers can help

A student with dyslexia outlines how teachers could support him in class.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

How teachers can help (NZ)
Diversity and the Treaty of Waitangi

“The concept of 'diversity' is central to the (BES) synthesis. This frame rejects the notion of a 'normal' group and 'other' or minority groups of children and constitutes diversity and difference as central to the classroom endeavour and central to the focus of quality teaching in Aotearoa, New Zealand. It is fundamental to the approach taken to diversity in New Zealand education that it honours the Treaty of Waitangi.”

Source: Quality Teaching for Diverse Students in Schooling: Best Evidence Synthesis Iteration (2003)
Diversity and the Treaty of Waitangi

Resources and downloads

Supporting future-oriented learning and teaching – a New Zealand perspective

A report commissioned by the Ministry of Education. Theme 2 explores new views of equity, diversity, and inclusivity.

Index for Inclusion: Developing learning and participation in schools

A set of materials developed by the Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education to guide UK schools through a process of inclusive school development.

Springboards 2 Practice: Belonging

Studies both overseas and in New Zealand have found that students with disabilities don’t always experience a sense of belonging in their relationships with others in their classes and schools.

Research perspective

Deficit-focused ideas about any students are very powerful and can strongly influence what teachers and other staff do at every level in any school (Ainscow et al, 2006; Bishop, Berryman, Cavanagh, and Teddy, 2007).

Source: Learning better together: Working towards inclusive education in New Zealand schools (p 12)
Research perspective
Promote high expectations

High expectations is one of eight principles in The New Zealand Curriculum.

The high expectation principle calls for teachers to support and empower all students to learn and achieve personal excellence, regardless of individual circumstances. 

Explore practical strategies in the following resources:

 

  1. High expectations in your classroom

  2. The principle of high expectations

  3. High expectations

Source: Ministry of Education

Promote high expectations
Parent perspective (NZ) (video)
Preparing students for life

A parent reminds us that we are preparing students for life.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Te Toi Tupu (NZ)

Parent perspective (NZ)
Teacher perspective (NZ) (video)
Developing inclusive practice at Onslow College

John Robinson, HoD Learning support, talks of his intrinsic belief that all students can learn.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Teacher perspective (NZ)
Students’ perspective (NZ) (video)
Don’t cotton-wool your kids

Two students with low vision discuss the importance of high expectations.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: BLENNZ1 (NZ)

Students’ perspective (NZ)

Resources and downloads

High expectation principle (NZ)

This section on New Zealand curriculum online draws together research, digital resources, and examples to support leaders and teachers as they consider the high expectations principle.

A student’s experience of leadership (NZ) (video)
Learning and leadership

Matt Frost talks about his experience as a deputy head boy with ASD.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Te Toi Tupu (NZ)

A student’s experience of leadership (NZ)
Student leadership in classroom (NZ) (video)
Opportunities to lead learning with peers

Sandra Gillies from Onslow College explains strategies that increase leadership opportunities for students.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Student leadership in classroom (NZ)
Self-leadership

I think what's good about the direction that we are going in now around inclusive education … gives more opportunity for them [students] to express their own form of leadership and that can be self-leadership, leadership in your own life.

But also the ability to lead other people and learning I feel should ideally develop that wide conception of what we mean by leadership so that you can feel resilient and confident in leading your own life but also, if you get opportunities to lead others and engage with others, then you’re able to develop the confidence to do that.

Source: Matt Frost, who was deputy head boy in his school, has autism, and is a disability advocate and policy analyst
Self-leadership
Inspirational peers (NZ) (video)
My hopes and dreams

Some students have a vision for the future that is bigger than their personal goals.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, Inclusive Education (NZ)

Inspirational peers (NZ)
Listening to students (NZ) (video)
Te Awamutu - You have a message

"I think it is really important that teachers listen to what we’ve got to say."

View transcript

Source: NZC Online (NZ)

Listening to students (NZ)
Practical peer support (NZ) (video)
Encouraging a strong and responsive peer culture

Recognise and value the practical support peers can give to each other.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Enabling e-Learning

Practical peer support (NZ)
Collaborative strategies

A skilled teacher optimises task sequences, not only to directly facilitate the different stages of learning cycles for individual students, but also to build up a peer learning culture that can intensify the challenges and supports for learning.

Source: Quality Teaching for Diverse Students in Schooling: Best Evidence Synthesis (p. 91)
Collaborative strategies
Classroom approaches at Onslow College (NZ) (video)
Classroom approaches – Dyslexia

Listening and speaking are powerful learning modes for students with dyslexia.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Classroom approaches at Onslow College (NZ)
Peer tutoring

The advantages of peer tutoring

Benefits for tutees

  • more individual teaching
  • gains in learning
  • gains in social/relationship skills, for example, communicating, accepting help
  • improvement in attitude towards learning
  • improvement in self-esteem

Benefits for tutors

  • practice/reinforcement of skills at earlier levels
  • gains in learning
  • insight into the learning process
  • development of social/relationship skills, for example, listening, encouraging
  • development of responsibility 
  • development of self-esteem

Benefits for teachers

  • increased opportunity to interact effectively with a range of individual students
  • more effective use of time
  • greater coverage of individual needs
  • opportunities to observe students at work, and to assess skills

Source: The Three Rs of Diversity: Teaching Strategies for Inclusive Classrooms Part 2: Peer Tutoring

Peer tutoring
Discussing friendships (video)
Helping students talk about friendships

An animated video to support junior classes to talk about friendships.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Start Empathy (UK)

Discussing friendships

Resources and downloads

Teaching strategies for inclusive classrooms part 2: Peer tutoring

Information to support setting up a successful peer tutoring programme in your classroom. Created for the NZ Ministry of Education.

Teaching strategies for inclusive classrooms part 1: Cooperative learning

Information to support setting up a successful cooperative learning programme in your classroom. Created for the NZ Ministry of Education.

Summary of literature review findings

A literature review summarising cooperative and collaborative classroom strategies, produced by Victoria University of Wellington.

Changing the classroom environment – Tony’s story

Tony Renshaw, a teacher at Rotorua Lakes High School, and Russell Bishop of the School of Education, Waikato University discuss the impacts of collaborative strategies and peer mentoring.

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Planning learning where everyone can participate and achieve

Consider a framework such as Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to guide the planning of inclusive teaching and learning. UDL supports the design of the least restictive learning environments for students, where barriers are minmised and learning supports and flexibility are built in to the environment at the outset.

“Most importantly, children have the right to be consulted and taken account of, to physical integrity, to access to information, to freedom of speech and opinion, and to participate in and challenge decisions made on their behalf .” (Smith, 1997).

Jude McAthur - Learning better together: Working towards inclusive education in New Zealand schools (p 14)  

Image source: Ministry of Education

Suggestions and resources

UDL at Silverstream School (NZ) (video)
Universal Design for Learning and inclusive classrooms

Linda Ojala describes how she uses a Universal Design for Learning framework.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

UDL at Silverstream School (NZ)
Building in flexibility using UDL (image)
3 principles of UDL based on the work of CAST Center of Applied Special Technologies
Utilise the UDL guidelines

Use the UDL guidelines to create environments students can adapt and customise.

Source: Adapted from CAST by CORE Education

Building in flexibility using UDL
Offer flexible options

Creating flexible and responsive environments allows students to make choices about:

  1. tools and resources they might use (digital and non-digital)

  2. methods to share their ideas and understanding

  3. subject content

  4. how they physically access an environment

  5. order of learning tasks

  6. when to sit assessments

  7. who they might access for help

  8. the process to finish or complete a task

  9. who they might work and collaborate with.

Offer flexible options
Making it work for everyone (image)
What benefits people with special needs benefits everyone
Clearing a path

Consider how a solution for one student can be offered as an option for everyone.

Minimise barriers and optimise flexibility at the outset.

Source: Michael. F. Giangreco

Making it work for everyone
Identifying student needs (image)
DSC 0249
Student needs inform teacher practice and learning design

Support learners to understand their needs as learners. Understand their motivation, the importance of emotions in achievement, and the social nature of learning. Be sensitive to learners’ individual difference and their prior knowledge.

Source: Ministry of Education

Identifying student needs

Resources and downloads

Education that fits: Review of international trends in the education of students with special educational needs

Overview of UDL by Dr David Mitchell, University of Canterbury. The theme of this chapter is that educational services and policies should be universally designed. Regular education should be accessible to all students in terms of pedagogy, curriculum and resourcing, through the design of differentiated learning experiences that minimise the need for subsequent modifications for particular circumstances or individuals.

Modern learning environments

An illustrated paper by Mark Osborne of CORE Education, 2013.

Origins of UDL

A succinct overview of the origins of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), from the Maryland State Department of Education, US.

Labelling students

As a teaching team, discuss the language you use to describe students’ well-being and their learning needs

Consider the impact of identifying students through phrases such as “struggling readers”, “low achievers”, “special needs students,” or “slow learners”.

Instead take an evidence-based approach. Focus on what students can do and articulate next steps in their learning that both the students and their families can understand and embrace.

Labelling students
Using positive language (image)
Screen Shot Linda Ojala with student
Focusing on what a student can do and possible next steps

Model and discuss positive ways to talk about learning with students, teacher’s aides, and the wider school community.

Source: Ministry of Education, Inclusive Education (NZ)

Using positive language
The impact of social attitudes on students (video)
No excuses: TV and radio commercials

The No Excuses advertising campaign from the Canadian Association for Community Living. A series of three videos that play consecutively.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Canadian Association of Community Living (Canada)

The impact of social attitudes on students
Students supporting students (NZ) (video)
Inclusion in the classroom

To support a peer prepare for their first school camp, students at Houghton Valley School made a book using digital photos with captions.  

No captions or transcript available

Source: Enabling eLearning

Students supporting students (NZ)
Including all learners (video)
Students talk about inclusion

In the first part of this video students share their views on what inclusion means to them.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Including all learners

Resources and downloads

CACL No excuses TV commercial 2

This commercial from Canadian Association for Community Living (CACL) demonstrates why there is no excuse for students with intellectual disabilities to be in separate classrooms.

No excuses radio commercial

A short radio commercial from Canadian ACL with Jessica, a grade 5 student with special learning needs shares some of the prejudices she faces.

What students want

Students ask not to be separated from peers and request that teachers:

  1. get to know them

  2. give them opportunities to talk about what school is like for them

  3. listen to their views

  4. take their views into consideration when they are planning and teaching, so they can learn

  5. support them to make school a better place for them

  6. allow them to be part of their peer group and to be fully involved.

Source: Extract from Learning better together: Working towards inclusive education in New Zealand schools

What students want
Self-advocacy at Fraser High (NZ) (video)
Problem-solving strategies to manage learning

A student with dyslexia reflects on managing her learning (one section of a longer video). 

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Enabling e-Learning (NZ)

Self-advocacy at Fraser High (NZ)
Student partnership at Onslow College (NZ) (video)
Planning flexible learning to support a student with Down syndrome

Brooke Houghton describes how she designs flexible learning environments.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Student partnership at Onslow College (NZ)
Student-designed learning spaces (NZ) (video)
Fit for purpose

Anne Keneally describes how in partnership with students, the classroom layout and learning spaces were redesigned. 

No captions or transcript available

Source: EDtalks (NZ)

Student-designed learning spaces (NZ)
Talk to students

Design for all learners by finding ways to:

  1. Include student voice in the design of the learning environment.

  2. Create flexible spaces that can be changed, rearranged based on student needs and preferences at the time.

  3. Ask students what would help in their learning.

Source: Adapted from CAST UDL Curriculum Self check

Talk to students

Resources and downloads

Encouraging student voice

Information for classroom teachers to support the development of student language and communication from the Inclusive Practices website (NZ).

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Taking a community approach to supporting learning and well-being

Inclusive values are developed through a student’s lived experiences and their exposure to other cultures and world-views. Bring your community into the classroom and take your classroom out to the community.

Indicators for building community:

  • Everyone is made to feel welcome.
  • Students help each other.
  • Staff collaborate with each other.
  • Staff and students treat one another with respect.
  • There is a partnership between staff and parents/carers.
  • Staff and governors work well together.
  • All local communities are involved in the school.
Source: Index for Inclusion: Developing learning and participation in schools

Suggestions and resources

Family involvement, Silverstream School (NZ) (video)
Valuing what students and families bring to learning

Linda Ojala describes how families contribute to the class programme.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Family involvement, Silverstream School (NZ)
Working with families at Onslow College (NZ) (video)
Sharing the aspirations of parents and whānau

John Robinson describes the impact of working closely with parents and whānau.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Working with families at Onslow College (NZ)
Ideas for working with whānau

Suggestions for working closely with parents, caregivers, and whānau

  1. Communicate and share information in ways that work for everyone, for example, social media, playground conversations, email, Skype, a notebook, class blog, newsletters with photos.

  2. Value parents’ and caregivers’ knowledge about their child and assessments they have had done out of school.

  3. Involve whānau in determining strategies to support student learning and well-being at home and school.

  4. Work with programmes or materials parents are using to maximise consistency and support for the student.

  5. Share information about out-of-school programmes that may boost self-esteem (for example, groups for music, art, or sporting interests).

  6. Recognise areas of expertise and experience and look for opportunities to explicitly value and utilise them in the classroom.

Ideas for working with whānau
Whānau and iwi involvement

Strong engagement and contribution from students and those who are best placed to support them – parents and whānau, hapū, iwi, Māori organisations, communities and businesses – have a strong influence on students’ success. Māori students’ learning is strengthened when education professionals include a role for parents and whānau, hapū, iwi, and Māori organisations and communities in curriculum, teaching and learning.

Source: Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success: The Māori Education Strategy 2013–2017, p. 23
Whānau and iwi involvement
Listening to families (NZ) (video)
Home-school connections support well-being (NZ)

Parents, Dayna and Phil, found sharing successful approaches and incorporating their daughter’s interests reduced anxiety and provided consistency between home and school.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Listening to families (NZ)

Resources and downloads

Partners in learning: Good practice

This September 2008 ERO report discusses the factors that contribute to the success of “engagement”, defined as a meaningful, respectful partnership between schools and their parents, whānau, and communities.

Summary of Ka Hikitia: Accelerating success 2013–2017

A Ministry of Education resource that supports educators to ensure that Māori students achieve educational success. It includes guiding principles, focus areas and goals and actions to facilitate change.

Resources for engaging with Pasifika parents, families, and communities

This area of the TKI website provides a wide range of resources and information to support engagement with Pasifika parents, families, and communities.

Perspectives of whānau

Parents of students needing additional support outline their needs and how schools can best work with them to meet those needs. Key information is from the ERO report Partners in learning: Parents’ voices. An example of practice from a primary school and discussion questions are provided on this page from the Inclusive Practices website (NZ).

Working as a community

The relationships between whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, kotahitanga, and rangatiratanga school culture to build school and community culture are explained. Networks of support that can be accessed are identified on this page from the Inclusive Practices website (NZ).

Working with community groups (image)
PASG Logo
Building relationships with community and cultural groups

Build relationships with local iwi and Pasifika cultural and disability groups. Involve your class in projects that support your community and provide authentic learning contexts.

Source: Pasifika Autism Support Group

Working with community groups
Finding our voice (NZ) (video)
Finding our voice

An account of Te Kura o Kutarere School partnering with the local community, and supported by the innovative use of digital tools.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Liz Stevenson (NZ)

Finding our voice (NZ)
Going into the community (NZ) (video)
Te Mana Kōrero – The school in the community

The Hiruharama School community delivers meals-on-wheels to their kuia and kaumātua.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Te Mangōroa (NZ)

Going into the community (NZ)
Learning from others (NZ) (video)
Learning from the stories of others

An adult with autism talks about how his school experiences set him up to succeed.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Te Toi Tupu (NZ)

Learning from others (NZ)
Have high expectations (NZ) (video)
Don’t cotton-wool your kids

Two students with low vision discuss the importance of high expectations.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: BLENNZ1 (NZ)

Have high expectations (NZ)
Inspirational peers (NZ) (video)
Inspirational peers

Some students have a vision for the future that is bigger than their personal goals.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education, inclusive education videos (NZ)

Inspirational peers (NZ)

Resources and downloads

Information for parents and caregivers of children with special education needs: Support organisations and useful contacts

A list of national organisations that support students with additional needs and their families, compiled by the Ministry of Education.

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This is a Ministry of Education initiative

Building a world-leading education system that equips all New Zealanders with the knowledge, skills, and values to be successful citizens in the 21st century.